News


Quantum Computing Summer School Fellowship

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 20 December 2017

​​​​​​​The Quantum Computing Summer School is an immersive 10-week curriculum that includes tutorials from world-leading experts in quantum computation as well as one-on-one mentoring from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) staff scientists who are conducting cutting-edge quantum computing research. Summer school fellowship recipients will be exposed to the theoretical foundations of quantum computation and will become skilled at programming commercial quantum computers, such as those developed by D-Wave Systems and IBM. Ten students will be awarded a fellowship from LANL that covers travel, living expenses in Los Alamos, and salary, with a fellowship value ranging from $7,500 to $13,000, based on academic rank (junior, senior, 1st year graduate student, etc.).


Understanding the Link Between Photonic and Electronic Performance of 2D Semiconducting Layers

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 20 December 2017

Susan Fullerton and her colleagues wrote a scientific report on deconvoluting the photonic and electronic response of two-dimensional (2D) materials for the case of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). What are the main criteria which provide evidence that the material is “high quality”? Are the photonic properties or electronic performance? Susan Fullerton and her colleagues have studied the MoS2 materials and their devices to answer this question and to find the correlation between electronic and optical properties in 2D materials. In their study, they used Raman, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL), high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field effect transistors (FET) fabrication electrolyte gate application methods to characterize MoS2.


Secure Quantum Communications School

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 14 December 2017

The 1st "Secure Quantum Communications (SQC)" School is funded and organised by the European Innovative Training Network "Quantum Communications for All (QCall)". QCALL is a European Innovative Training Network that endeavours to take the next necessary steps to bring the developing quantum technologies closer to the doorsteps of end users. QCALL empowers a nucleus of 15 doctoral researchers in this area to provide secure communications in the European continent and, in the long run, to its connections worldwide. QCALL offers research work packages and training activities in the form of Schools and Workshops. 


Quantum Information Science and Engineering Network: Building "Triplets" to Bridge Academia and Industry

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 13 December 2017

Quantum Information Science and Engineering Network (QISE-NET) is housed at the Chicago Quantum Exchange, an intellectual hub and partnership for advancing academic and industrial efforts in the science and engineering of quantum information. QISE-NET is built "Triplets" to Bridge Academia and Industry which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation within the “Quantum Leap” and “Growing Convergent Research” Big Ideas. TRIPLETS program offers excellent opportunities for graduate students in all areas of quantum information science and engineering.

 


Webinar on Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI)

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 13 December 2017

Last month University of Pittsburgh host a webinar titled as “Guide to Research Roadmap: Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) in collaboration with Mcallister and Quin consulting firm. As Pittsburgh Quantum Institute, we attended this event to be able to share the information on this webinar with our members. The purposes of the webinar were to explain the crucial steps needed to proactively plan for the MURI program and using the McAllister & Quinn (M&Q) MURI Research Roadmap (available to PQI members with e-mail request). In this article, we would like first to discuss briefly what the M&Q MURI Research Roadmap is and how our members can reach this information and then summarize the topics discussed in this webinar.


Department of Energy Accelerates the Development and Research in Quantum Information Science

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 13 December 2017

On November 29. 2017 Department of Energy (DOE) released a letter on Accelerating Development of and Research Impacts from Quantum Information Science (QIS) to encourage submission of innovative research ideas in QIS via any appropriate existing mechanism.  In this letter intersection between the developments in QIS and missions, interests, capabilities, and portfolios of the program offices within the DOE's Office of Science (SC) were emphasized. They stated that SC has interests, expertise, and capabilities in a wide range of QIS-related topics, including frontier computing, machine learning, optimization, quantum materials, isotopes, cryogenics, imaging, and field theory. In addition, they itemized their resources relevant to QIS and mentioned the organized workshops held by SC to indicate their support on QIS. Continuity of the financial support of the future computing technologies in the DOE SC Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Request was stated. Finally, they encourage the collaboration between academia and DOE National Laboratories and recommend researchers to contact program managers on proposal submission.

For more information read the original letter here!


Discovery of a Mechanism for Dislocation Nucleation and Migration Driven by Surface Segregation

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 6 December 2017

Judith C. Yang and her colleagues answered the question of how dislocations nucleate and migrate at heterointerfaces in dissimilar-material systems on their recently published article on Nature Materials. n this study, Judith Yang and her colleagues showed that atomic segregation acts as a source for generating dislocations for the first time. They have used Cu–Au alloy system for studying surface segregation. Real-time transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to both spatially and temporally resolve the transition of the coherent, dislocation free interface between a Cu3Au-segregated surface and a Cu(Au) crystal substrate into a semi-coherent structure through the nucleation and subsequent migration of misfit accommodating dislocations. They combined their experimental study with the teory by using density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. They discovered a mechanism for dislocation nucleation and migration driven by surface segregation of solute atoms in a solid solution. Their results show that the surface-segregation-induced composition variations act as the source of strain/stress that drives the nucleation and migration of misfit dislocations, and demonstrate how the surface segregation phenomenon of an alloy constituent can be employed for developing atomistic insight into understanding the formation processes of misfit-accommodating dislocations.


Where are hot carriers created in plasmonically enhanced semiconductor substrates?

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 5 December 2017

PQI members Hrvoje Petek, Jin Zhao and their colleagues investigated a less known fact about the microscopic details of how the combined optical, electronic and chemical properties of metal/semiconductor interfaces define the coupling of light into the electronic reagents on their recent paper published in Nature Photonics. In this study, they investigated the coherence and hot electron dynamics in a prototypical Ag nanocluster/TiO2 heterojunction via ultrafast two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT).  The silver nanoclustors used in this study were grown via e-beam evaporation of Ag on top of TiO2 surface.They have shown that the plasmon excitation, dephasing and hot electron processes that are related to plasmonically enhanced photocatalysis involve complex physical and chemical interactions, with strong interfacial character involving the chemical and plasmonic coupling of Ag nanoclusters and the TiO2 substrate that cannot be predicted by the properties of the component materials, but rather require an understanding of their interactions. They found that the dephasing of the perpendicular and parallel plasmons by the dielectric screening response of the TiO2 substrate generates hot electrons with anisotropic and non-thermal distributions.


Prof. Lillian Chong has created the Creative Science Summer Writing Program for Undergraduates

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 5 December 2017

This past summer, Prof. Lillian Chong started a creative science writing program to help undergraduates develop skills for communicating science to non-scientists. The pilot group consisted of three highly motivated chemistry majors who pursued various types of creative writing, including poetry and narrative nonfiction. 

The development of effective writing skills in the sciences has become increasingly more important given the critical roles that science plays in society. To help undergraduates at the University of Pittsburgh develop such highly valuable skills, the Creative Science Writing Summer Program is intended to foster undergraduate writing projects that are focused on communicating science in a compelling, accessible manner to non-scientists. This Program is available to undergraduates in the Departments of Chemistry, Biological Sciences, Physics & Astronomy, Neuroscience, History & Philosophy of Science, and/or English. Each of six selected participants will be awarded a prize of $250 to pursue creative writing involving scientific journalism, poetry, and other works of nonfiction during the summer.

 


Prof. Daniel Lambrecht is a winner of the ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 4 December 2017

Congratulations to Daniel Lambrecht, professor in the Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, the winner of the ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry!

The ACS COMP OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award program provides $1,000 to up to four outstanding tenure-track junior faculty members to present their work in COMP poster session at the Spring 2018 New Orleans, LA ACS National Meeting. The Awards are designed to assist new faculty members in gaining visibility within the COMP community. Award certificates and $1,000 prizes will be presented at the COMP Poster session. Applications for Outstanding Junior Faculty Awards are invited from all current tenure-track junior (untenured) faculty who are members of ACS and the ACS Division of Computers in Chemistry.  Selection criteria included the novelty and importance of the work to be presented, CV of the applicant, as well as the level of departmental support as indicated by the applicant's department Chair or Chair designee. 

 

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