Profile Videos

Edward Beall is a graduate student in in the Department of Chemistry at Pitt.

He works in the Waldeck lab and observes charge transport through molecular bridges by studying the electrical conductance of a single molecule. This will aid in miniaturizing circuitry, hopefully to the nanoscale. 

Edward won a travel award at the Science 2015 poster session for his poster on "Scanning Tunneling Microscope Break Junction Method with Continuous Bias Modulation”.

Megan Kirkendall is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

She works in the Levy lab where she researches quantum simulation at the lanthanum aluminate strontium titanate interface. Her research involves engineering a lattice interface on the nanometer scale, and then using that information to simulate a quantum system that can be studied. This process provides insight into quantum systems that cannot be simulated with a normal computer.

Megan won the grand prize at the Science 2014 poster session for her poster on “Experimental Quantum Simulation Using 1D LaAlO3/SrTiO3”.

Devashish Gopalan is a graduate student in the Department of Physics of Carnegie Mellon University. 

He works in the Feenstra lab where he normally researches the large-scale synthesis of 2D heterotructures. He has recently shifted his interest in the direction of studying physical phenomena within the 2-dimensional limit. 

Devashish won a travel award at the Science 2015 poster session for his poster on “Formation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride On Graphene-Covered Copper Surfaces”.

Mitch Groenenboom is a graduate student in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at Pitt.

He works in the Keith group on molecular-promoted CO2 reduction, anti-corrosion coatings, and multiscale modeling of metal nanoparticles.

Mitch won a travel award at the Science 2015 poster session for his poster on "Aqueous Phase CO2 Reduction with Sodium Borohydride: an Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Nudged-Elastic Band Mechanistic Study.

 

 

Peng Ji is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

He works in the Dutt lab on the optical trapping of nanodiamonds in the air and collect the emitted photoluminescence. 

Peng won a travel award at the Science 2015 poster session for his poster on "Towards a Quantum Interface between Diamond Spin Qubits and Phonons in an Optical Trap". 

Adam Argondizzo is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

He works in the Petek lab where he focuses on Multiphoton Photoemission. His research will aid in increasing efficiency of photocatalytic processes towards producing clean energy. 

Adam won a travel award at the Science 2015 poster session for his poster on “Multi-Photon Photoemission Excitation in TiO2”.

Alexandre is an undergraduate senior who majors in physics at the University of Pittsburgh. He began his research with Professor Jeremy Levy when he was a freshman. Gauthier’s research focuses on the production of an advanced canvas analyzer, used to measure the electrical properties of multiterminal devices, and a low temperature scanning probe microscope, used to study electromechanical properties of single-electron transistors. He was awarded the Goldwater Scholarship for his innovations which was described by Chancellor Mark A. Nordenberg as “the highest national honor that can be won by undergraduate students studying science, math, or engineering, which makes the entire Pitt community particularly proud of Alexandre's selection.” 

Cong Wang is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

He works in the Petek lab where he does research in ultrafast surface phenomena.

Cong was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2014/2015 for his work on “Three-Dimensional Coherent Photoelectron Spectroscopy".

Michelle Tomczyk is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

She works in the Levy lab where she studies quantum transport phenomena at the lanthanum aluminate and strontium titanate interface. She creates nanostructures at the interface using an innovative AFM lithography technique in order to study emergent phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. This information can benefit classical as well as quantum computing.

Michelle won a travel award at the Science 2014 poster session for her poster on “Electron Pairing Without Superconductivity”.

Mathew Daniels is a graduate student in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University.

He works in the Xiao group on magnonics and antiferromagnets.

Mathew won a travel award at the Science 2014 poster session for his poster on “Spin-Transfer Torque Induced Spin Waves in Antiferromagnetic Insulators”.

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