David Waldeck

Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D., Chemistry, University of Chicago, 1983
Summary:

Chemistry and Dynamics in the Condensed Phase. Professor Waldeck's research program uses methods of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and microscopy to investigate primary processes in the condensed phase, which includes liquids, solids and liquid/solid interfaces. Current themes of his research are the fundamental understanding of electron transfer reactions, electron transport in supramolecular structures, and nanophotonics.

Solution Studies. His research program studies electron transfer processes experimentally in order to directly evaluate and improve theoretical models. Currently, his group is investigating how the electron transfer rate in semiconductor nanoparticle assemblies depends on energetic, geometric, and electrostatic features of the assemblies.  Other efforts are studying electron transfer between semiconductor nanoparticles and conjugated polymers and how it depends on the energetic, electrostatic, and chirality of the constituents. A major goal of these studies is to understand how the structural and energetic hierachy of nanometer scale assemblies can be manipulated to control the electron transfer.

Interfacial Charge Transfer. This effort probes charge transfer through monolayers and individual molecules by electrochemical and/or conducting probe methods. Previous work has used electrochemical studies to elucidate how the molecular properties (e.g., electronic character, chirality, and the nature of the molecule-electrode linkage) affect the observed tunneling barriers and molecular conductivities.  Current work is investigating how to manipulate the electronic and chemical nature of monolayer films to enhance the electronic interaction between a redox moiety and the electrode, with a particular focus on better understanding how to ‘wire’ biomolecules (proteins and oligonucleotides) to electrodes.

Nanophotonics. Technological breakthroughs in fabrication and characterization are allowing his group to probe the nature of light-matter interactions (photonics) for nanostructures and molecular assemblies. This work aims to develop a better understanding of the novel optical properties displayed by nanostructures and how to exploit them for applications in sensing and energy conversion.

Students
Namesort descending Position Email
Beall, Edward Graduate Student ejb65@pitt.edu
Bloom, Brian Graduate Student bpb8@pitt.edu
Davis, Arthur Graduate Student acd47@pitt.edu
Lamont, Dan Graduate Student dnl22@pitt.edu
Wei, Simon Graduate Student jiw105@pitt.edu
Wierzbinski, Emil Graduate Student

Edward Beall

Graduate Student

ejb65@pitt.edu
219 Parkman Avenue, Pittsburgh PA, 15260
443-277-2648

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh

Brian Bloom

Graduate Student

bpb8@pitt.edu
G-10 Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh PA, 15213

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh

Arthur Davis

Graduate Student

acd47@pitt.edu
G-10 Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh PA, 15213

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh

Dan Lamont

Graduate Student

dnl22@pitt.edu
G-10 Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh PA, 15213

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh

Simon Wei

Graduate Student

jiw105@pitt.edu
G-10 Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh PA, 15213

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh

Emil Wierzbinski

Graduate Student


G-10 Chevron Science Center, Pittsburgh PA, 15213

Affiliation:

Chemistry
University of Pittsburgh
Most Cited Publications
  1. "Photoisomerization dynamics of stilbenes," David H. WaldeckChem. Rev. 91, 415 (1991)
  2. "Noncovalent Engineering of Carbon Nanotube Surfaces by Rigid, Functional Conjugated Polymers," Jian Chen, Haiying Liu, Wayne A. Weimer, Mathew D. Halls, David H. Waldeck, and Gilbert C. Walker, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124, 9034 (2002)
  3. "Breakdown of Kramers theory description of photochemical isomerization and the possible involvement of frequency dependent friction" Stephan Velsko, Graham Fleming, and David H. Waldeck, J. Am. Chem. Soc.124, 9591 (2002)
  4. "Hydrogen-bonding self-assembly of multichromophore structures," Paolo Tecilla, Robert P. Dixon, Gregory Slobodkin, David S. Alavi, David H. Waldeck, Andrew D. Hamilton, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 112, 9408 (1990)
  5. "Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposite Infrared Sensor."  Basudev Pradhan, Kristina Setyowati, Haiying Liu, David H Waldeck, and Jian Chen.  Nano Letters 8.4 (2008)
Recent Publications
  1. "Voltage-Induced Long-Range Coherent Electron Transfer Through Organic Molecules."  Karen Michaeli, David N Baratan, David H Waldeck, and Ron Naaman.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2019)
  2. "Controlling Chemical Selectivity in Electrocatalysis with Chiral CuO-Coated Electrodes."  KB Ghosh, Wenyan Zhang, F Tassinari, Y Mastai, O Lidor-Shaley, R Naaman, P Moellers, D Nuerenberg, H Zacharias, J Wei, E Wierzbinski, and DH Waldeck.  Journal Phys. Chem. C 123.5 (2019)
  3. "Nano Ferromagnetism: Single Domain 10 nm Ferromagnetism Imprinted on Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Using Chiral Molecules."  Guy Koplovitz, Gregory Leitus, Supriya Ghosh, Brian P Bloom, Shira Yochelis, Dvir Rotem, Fabio Vischio, Marinella Striccoli, Elisabetta Fanizza, Ron Naaman, David H Waldeck, Danny Porath, and Yossi Paltiel.  Small 15.1 (2019)
  4. "What is Beyond Charge Trapping in Semiconductor Nanoparticle Sensitized Dopant Photolumiescence?"  Prasenjit Manna, Gouranga H Debnath, David H Waldeck, and Prasun Mukherjee.  Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters 9.21 (2018)
  5. "Directing Charge Transfer in Quantum Dot Assemblies."  Brian P Bloom, Ruibin Liu, Peng Zhang, Supriya Ghosh, Ron Naaman, David N Beratan, and David H Waldeck.  Accounts of Chemical Research 51.10 (2018)

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