News


Swing-Dancing Electron Pairs

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 13 May 2015

A research team led by PQI faculty Jeremy Levy has discovered electrons that can "swing dance". This unique electronic behavior can potentially lead to new families of quantum devices.

Superconductors, materials that permit electrical current to flow without energy loss, form the basis for magnetic resonance imaging devices as well as emergingtechnologies such as quantum computers. At the heart of all superconductors is the bunching of electrons into pairs.

The work, done in collaboration with researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, was published May 14 in the journal Nature.


Chandralekha Singh Reflects on Fifth International Conference on Women in Physics

  • By Workstudy User
  • 27 April 2015

This month's APS Back Page features PQI faculty Chandralekha Singh who describes the Fifth International Conference on Women in Physics with participation from 49 countries around the world: 

In August 2014, I attended the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP 2014) in Waterloo, Canada as part of the U.S. delegation. The conference was attended by approximately 215 female physicists and a few male physicists, all from 49 different countries. There were research talks, panels, workshops, breakout sessions and posters on issues related to women in physics.


Breakthrough in Particle Control Creates Special Half-Vortex Rotation

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 3 March 2015

A breakthrough in the control of a type of particle known as the polariton has created a highly specialized form of rotation. 

PQI faculty Andrew Daley and David Snoke and their colleages at Princeton University conducted a test in which they were able to arrange the particles into a 'ring geometry' form in a solid-state environment. The result was a half-vortex in a 'quantized rotation' form.

 


Quantum Mechanics Identifies Link Between CO2 Recycling Catalysts and Bimolecular Enzymes

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 22 January 2015

Researchers at PQI have identified a promising design principle for renewable energy catalysts. Utilizing advanced computational modeling, researchers found that chemicals commonly found in laboratories may play a similar role as biological catalysts that nature uses for efficient energy storage.

The article, "Thermodynamic Descriptors for Molecules That Catalyze Efficient CO  Electroreductions" published in the journal ACS Catalysis, was authored by PQI faculty John A. Keith, PhD, and Aude Marjolin, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow.


Pitt and CMU to Explore Library Collaboration

  • By Workstudy User
  • 12 January 2015

Pitt and Carnegie Mellon University announced Dec. 2 that the two institutions’ library systems would “conduct a thorough review of options for collaboration” and “seek input from faculty, staff, students and other stakeholders from our two universities, the city and the region.” During the review, which will result in a preliminary report in March and a final assessment in June, the search to replace University Library System head Rush Miller upon his Dec. 31 retirement will be suspended temporarily. CMU also has placed on hold its search for a director of collections and information access services for its libraries.

 


Topology in Condensed Matter: Tying Quantum Knots

  • By Workstudy User
  • 8 January 2015

This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) will cover the contemporary subject of topology in condensed matter systems. The course will provide "a simple and hands-on overview of topological insulators, Majoranas, and other topological phenomena focused on ongoing research."

This course is a joint effort of Delft University of Technology, QuTech, NanoFront, University of Maryland, and Joint Quantum Institute.

This 12 week course will start February 8, 2016. Find more information and enroll here.


New Discovery Could Pave the Way for Spin-based Computing

  • By Workstudy User
  • 25 December 2014

Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A research team led by PQI faculty Jeremy Levy has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures.

Levy and colleagues published their work in Nature Communications, elucidating their discovery of a form of magnetism that can be stabilized with electric fields rather than magnetic fields.


A 'Quantum Repository' to Make Learning Chemistry Easier

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 19 November 2014

Remember constructing ball-and-stick models of molecules in your high school or college chemistry classes? Well, that might soon be a thing of the past for Pitt students looking to get a three-dimensional understanding of molecular structures.

PQI faculty Geoffrey Hutchison and Daniel Lambrecht recently received a 2014 Camille and Henry Dreyfus Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences award for their project, "Creating an Open Quantum Chemistry Repository." This effort aims to create an open mobile-ready, web-based database of accurate, quantum calculations of molecules. The "Pitt Quantum Repository" will consist at first of 50,000 to 100,000 molecules and quantum chemical data. The database will grow over time to include more molecules and more computed properties.


Conserving a Valuable Resource: System Will Recover Helium for Physics Lab Use

  • By Workstudy User
  • 17 September 2014

Pitt’s new physics department helium recovery system will put the campus at the forefront of U.S. university efforts to conserve the finite supply of this increasingly expensive laboratory gas.

With U.S. helium reserves being sold off and prices rising, Pitt has used the National Institute of Standards and Technology-funded renovation of mid-campus physics buildings, undertaken over the past five years, as an opportunity to install a new helium recovery system. It should be able to reliquefy at least 90 percent of the gas currently used and allow for experiments that might not otherwise have been affordable, says Patrick Irvin, faculty member in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Pages