Announcements

Prof. Daniel Lambrecht is a winner of the ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 4 December 2017

Congratulations to Daniel Lambrecht, professor in the Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, the winner of the ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry!

The ACS COMP OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award program provides $1,000 to up to four outstanding tenure-track junior faculty members to present their work in COMP poster session at the Spring 2018 New Orleans, LA ACS National Meeting. The Awards are designed to assist new faculty members in gaining visibility within the COMP community. Award certificates and $1,000 prizes will be presented at the COMP Poster session. Applications for Outstanding Junior Faculty Awards are invited from all current tenure-track junior (untenured) faculty who are members of ACS and the ACS Division of Computers in Chemistry.  Selection criteria included the novelty and importance of the work to be presented, CV of the applicant, as well as the level of departmental support as indicated by the applicant's department Chair or Chair designee. 

 

Chandralekha Singh has been named an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow!

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 30 November 2017

Congratulations to Chandralekha Singh, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, for being named a 2017 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

The AAAS has named two more Pitt researchers as 2017 fellows. Karen M. Arndt, professor in the Department of Biological Science and Astronomy and Rory Cooper, professor and founding director of Pitt’s Human Engineering Research Laboratories. They were among the 396 individuals recognized for accomplishments nationwide. The fellows join a cohort that includes groundbreaking scientists such as inventor Thomas Edison, anthropologist Margaret Mead and biologist James Watson.

Left to right: Karen M. Arndt, Rory Cooper and Chandralekha Singh 

Postdoctoral Fellowships: Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics (CMSP)

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 29 November 2017

International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) seeks applications for postdoctoral positions starting Fall 2018 from outstanding young scientists of any nationality with a strong research record; women are particularly encouraged to apply. With about 30 group members (faculty, visitors, postdocs and graduate students), an intense programme of workshops and conferences, and close collaborations with local scientific institutions such as SISSA, Elettra, and the University of Trieste, the CMSP group provides a vibrant international research environment for postdoctoral fellows. Postdoctoral fellows are also encouraged, and supported, to participate in activities in developing countries in order to promote the mission of the ICTP. 

ICTP offers internationally competitive remuneration and a number of benefits including a pension contribution and special allowances for family members. Appointments will be made for two years, with the possibility of renewal for one more year. Preference will be given to applicants in the areas of expertise of the CMSP group

 

From Quantum Mechanics to Force Fields

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 22 November 2017

Ken Jordan and his colleague are invited to write a special topic issue in the journal of chemical physics (JCP). This work is dedicated to the ongoing efforts of the theoretical chemistry community to develop a new generation of accurate force fields based on data from high-level electronic structure calculations and to develop faster electronic structure methods for testing and designing force fields as well as for carrying out simulations. 

Science2017 Poster Award Winners

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 15 November 2017

Congratulations to the Science2017 Poster Award Winners!

Jierui Liang (Fullerton group, SSOE Chemical and Petroleum Engineering) won the grand prize award ($1,000 travel award plus an iPad).

Minh Nguyen Vo (Johnson Group, SSOE Chemical and Petroleum Engineering), Olivia Lanes (Hatridge Group, Pitt Physics), Scott Crawford (Millstone Group, Pitt Chemistry), Maxwell Li (Sokalski Group CMU Materials Science and Engineering), Zeeshan Ahmad (Viswanathan Group, CMU Mechanical Engineering) won the poster awards ($1,000 travel award plus Echo Dot).

Megan Kirkendall Briggeman (Levy Lab, Pitt Physics), Amy Carlson (Evanseck Group, Duquesne Chemistry and Biochemistry), David Myers (Snoke Group, Pitt Physics) won the veteran awards (choice of Amazon Echo Spot/Echo or Google Home mini).

PQI undergraduate students Jessica Montone (Levy Lab) and Joe Albro (Levy Lab) presented a poster at the undergraduate session of Science2017.

Also, special thanks to the poster judges for participating in this event. 

NASA Workshop on Quantum Computing for Aeroscience and Engineering

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 15 November 2017

November 7-8, 2017, physics students and scientist from diffrent places were arrived at the NASA Langley research center for attending Quantum Computing workshop.

The objective of this workshop was to bring together experts on quantum information science and computation to understand the latest developments and current challenges in algorithms, hardware, and technology transition to engineering applications. The aims of workshop was to accelerate technology transition towards outstanding engineering problems that were expected to be achievable using quantum computations in the coming decade. The workshop’s goals were included developing a roadmap for success towards solution strategies for engineering applications. The interested stakeholders were presented or taken part in discussion on challenges to transition the current state-of-the-art to large scale engineering and data science related problems. 

 

Discussions were focused on the following four areas:

  • Quantum algorithms
  • Quantum computing hardware
  • Manufacturing and control of quantum systems
  • Engineering applications

American Leadership in Quantum Technology

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 10 November 2017

On October 24, 2017 house committee on science, space, and technology held hearings on “American Leadership in Quantum Technology QT.” The goal of the hearing was to provide audiences the view of United States’ (US) and other nations’ research and development efforts to develop quantum computing and related technologies, and to identify what more can be done to robust these efforts. For this regard, committee members made their opening statements on quantum technology and US leadership in this area.  Witnesses from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Energy (DOE), IBM, National Photonic Initiative, and Argon National Lab were emphasized the importance of study and research in quantum information science and technology to sustain the leadership in this area.

W. Vincent Liu Named a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS)

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 16 October 2017

Congratulations to W. Vincent Liu for being named a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) by the Division of Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics.

Vincent was elected for elucidating Landau damping of collective excitations in Bose-Einstein condensates, advancing the study of spin-polarized Fermi gases by introducing the concept of breached pair superfluidity, pioneering the theory of higher orbital bands in optical lattices, and working with experimentalists to confirm the theory.

 

Assistant Professor Tevis Jacobs Receives $305,000 from the National Science Foundation

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 16 October 2017

Tevis Jacobs, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and material science at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to observe and measure nanoscale contact inside of an electron microscope-enabling for the first time visualization of the atomic structure of the component materials while they are in contact. The team's project will measure surface roughness of tiny particles and characterize the fundamental relationship between adhesion and roughness at small sizes.

Assistant Professor Benjamin Hunt wins DOE’s Early Career Award

  • By Leena Aggarwal
  • 16 October 2017

Benjamin Hunt, assistant professor of physics and member of the Quantum Electronics Group at Carnegie Mellon University was awarded a prestigious $750,000 Early Career Grant from the Department of Energy to study how layering different two-dimensional crystals (such as graphene and the magnetic insulator CrSiTe3) can lead to new, emergent properties in the composite layered structure.

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