Fall 2020

Michael Hatridge Partners with Brookhaven QIS Center

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 19 October 2020

Brookhaven National Laboratory was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science to lead one of the five National Quantum Information Science (QIS) Research Centers. Brookhaven Lab will lead the Co-design Center for Quantum Advantage (C2QA), which will focus on quantum computing.

Over the next five years, C2QA will be awarded up to $115 million to build the fundamental tools necessary for the United States to create scalable, distributed, and fault-tolerant quantum computer systems.  The C2QA team comprises several national labs, research centers, universities, and industry. Among their collaborators, Brookhaven has partnered with Prof. Michael Hatridge at the University of Pittsburgh.

Musings on the U.S Quantum Economy

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 14 October 2020

The Quantum Information Science and Technology (QIST) Summit, hosted by the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Lab, took place on October 7-8th and connected industry, governmental, and academic experts to discuss six broad themes in panel sessions. PQI students attended the online event and prepared summaries of each panel.

The first of the panels was titled “Considerations for Building the US Quantum Economy”. The panelists covered topics like ethical considerations, industrial impacts, and market opportunities for the future of quantum in the economy. The moderator was Rima Kasia Oueid, the Commercialization Executive of the Office of Technology Transitions at the Department of Energy

Outlook on Quantum Materials R&D

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 14 October 2020

The Quantum Information Science and Technology (QIST) Summit, hosted by the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Lab, took place on October 7-8th and connected industry, governmental, and academic experts to discuss six broad themes in panel sessions. PQI students attended the online event and prepared summaries of each panel.

The Department of Energy Investments & Capabilities in Quantum Materials R&D panel discussed the foundational quantum information science (QIS) in discovering new quantum materials and molecular systems by controlling their unique properties such that they can be incorporated into qubits for quantum sensing, computing, and communication.

Some of the major challenges in quantum material research are characterizing the functionality of quantum devices at a fundamental level, innovative theory and computational tools, world-leading experimental capabilities, and most importantly, diverse research teams. The panel discussion was moderated by Linda Horton, (Associate Director of Science for Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy, Office of Science).

Where is Quantum Networking and Communication Heading?

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 14 October 2020

The Quantum Information Science and Technology (QIST) Summit, hosted by the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Lab, took place on October 7-8th and connected industry, governmental, and academic experts to discuss six broad themes in panel sessions. PQI students attended the online event and prepared summaries of each panel. 

The Quantum Networking and Communication panel discussion was moderated by Prof. David Awschalom from the University of Chicago, who is also the quantum group leader in Argonne National Laboratory. This panel mainly discussed recent developments and challenges in the field, driving areas of interests, the near- and long-term focus of the industry, and potential impact in society. 

Predicting Electrophiles for Multi-Component Reactions

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 14 October 2020

Using computational quantum mechanical modeling methods, Dr. Peng Liu and collaborators were able to calculate the electrophile compatibility score (ECS), which can be used to predict whether two electrophile starting materials are compatible with each other. Their work is published in Chem, “Compatibility Score for Rational Electrophile Selection in Pd/NBE Cooperative Catalysis”. 

What is 'Orthodox' Quantum Mechanics?

Speaker(s): 
David Wallace
Dates: 
Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 4:00pm

Abstract: What is called "orthodox'' quantum mechanics, as presented in standard foundational discussions, relies on two substantive assumptions --- the projection postulate and the eigenvalue-eigenvector link --- that do not in fact play any part in practical applications of quantum mechanics. I argue for this conclusion on a number of grounds, but primarily on the grounds that the projection postulate fails correctly to account for repeated, continuous and unsharp measurements (all of which are standard in contemporary physics) and that the eigenvalue-eigenvector link implies that...

Carnegie Mellon Researchers Partner With USRA and Amazon to Teach Quantum Computing Programming Foundations

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 7 October 2020

Carnegie Mellon and the Tepper School of Business have long been leaders in transformational education, where researchers successfully challenge the status quo to create new technologies and processes that solidify our reputation as innovative thinkers and doers.

Sridhar R. Tayur, Ford Distinguished Research Chair and University Professor of Operations Management, believes that quantum computing will be one of the next consequential innovations to put the university’s name in the history books.

 

Pitt Engineering Secures NSF Funding

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 29 September 2020

Three projects led by PQI professors in the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering, James McKone, Feng Xiong, and Nathan Youngblood, recently received funding from the National Science Foundation. Additionally, Ken Jordan in the Pitt Department of Chemistry is Co-PI on an NSF-funded project led by Lei Li to use computational methods to understand the mechanisms of wetting transparency of graphene on liquid substrates and demonstrate the real-time control of surface wettability

 

Detecting Acoustic Blackbody Radiation

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 22 September 2020

As objects heat up, they not only glow but also emit acoustic energy. This “acoustic blackbody radiation” may be as ubiquitous as its more famous electromagnetic cousin but is typically faint and difficult to characterize. Now, a pair of researchers, Thomas Purdy and Robinjeet Singh, have used a nanomechanical resonator to detect acoustic blackbody radiation from a remote source [1]. They say their technique—the acoustic analog of remote infrared thermometry—could lead to improvements in applications ranging from metrology to quantum information.

PQI Seminar: Dr. Jim Freericks

Dr. Jim Freericks from Georgetown University gave a talk titled "Operator Mechanics: A new form of quantum mechanics without waves or matrices" in the Pittsburgh Quantum Institute Fall Seminar series on Sept. 3rd, 2020.

His presentation slides can be found here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1zLohpkcooZx7fPrht0gZOfWvBg9Ja34B

Abstract: Quantum mechanics was created with the matrix mechanics of Heisenberg, Born, and Jordan. Schroedinger's wave mechanics shortly followed and allowed for simpler and more powerful calculations. Both Pauli and Dirac introduced a formulation of quantum mechanics based on operators and commutation relations, but it was never fully developed in the 1920's. Instead, Schroedinger formulated the operator approach with his factorization method, which later was adopted by the high-energy community as supersymmetric quantum mechanics. In this talk, I will explain how one can formulate nearly all of quantum mechanics algebraically by a proper use of the translation operator on top of Schroedinger's factorization method. I will give examples of how one can compute spherical harmonics algebraically, how one can find harmonic oscillator wavefunctions, and will even describe an operator-based derivation of the wavefunctions of Hydrogen. I will end with a proposal for a novel way to teach quantum mechanics, focusing first on conceptual ideas related to superposition, projective measurements, and entanglement. Then developing more conventional topics like spin, harmonic oscillator, angular momentum, interacting spin models, central potentials, particles in a box and so on. This is the subject of a book in progress entitled Quantum Mechanics without Calculus.

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