Featured

PQI Fellowships

  • By Krista Zottola
  • 1 November 2022

The PQI Fellowships are to be “awarded to students of exceptional ability and promise” who are pursuing a Ph.D. in Quantum Science or Engineering. Eligible graduate students will be selected from the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, the Swanson School of Engineering, and the School of Computing and Information. The numbers of Fellowships awarded to each School will be determined by the funding provided by the respective Schools. The primary consideration in ranking nominees is the nominee’s promise of achieving scholarly distinction in their field. All nominees must be within the nominating program’s guaranteed years of funding during the 2022-2023 academic year. All application materials are due by 5:00 PM on Friday, November 18, 2022.  

PQI 2022 Poster Award Winners

  • By Krista Zottola
  • 10 October 2022

Congratulations to our PQI 2022 Best Poster Award Winners! The poster session took place on September 13, 2022 at our PQI 2022 Event at the University Club Pittsburgh. The session was a large success thanks to the many students from a number of universities who participated by presenting their research. 

Poster Winners: Siddarth Achar, Paige Moncure, Nazifa Tabassum, Mihir Khanna, Mohammad Babar.  

Workshop on Cybersecurity of Quantum Computing

  • By Krista Zottola
  • 10 October 2022

The Pittsburgh Quantum Institute organized an invitation-only Workshop on Cybersecurity of Quantum Computing supported by the National Science Foundation and White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.  (See the announcement.). The workshop explored questions related to hardware and software security, protecting intellectual property, and detecting and preventing certain malicious algorithms from being run on quantum computers.

New Pittsburgh Quantum Institute (PQI) Director Named

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 18 July 2022

Last month, the founding director of PQI, Jeremy Levy, stepped down from the position.  PQI was founded in 2012 with the mission “to help unify and promote quantum science and engineering in Pittsburgh,” and Jeremy and PQI succeeded in doing exactly that. 

This month, we are excited to announce that Adam Leibovich will serve as the new Director for a three-year term (renewable). 

His long experience leading and growing essential parts of the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, coupled with his extensive and successful research program, and his...

Dickey Wins Sosman Award

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 21 June 2022

Elizabeth Dickey is the recipient of the 2023 Sosman Award in recognition of outstanding achievement in basic science that results in a significant impact and advancement in the field of ceramics. The Robert B. Sosman Award is the highest recognition of scientific accomplishment given by the Basic Science Division of ACerS and is given in recognition of outstanding achievement in basic science of an area that results in a significant impact to the field of ceramics. The award will be presented at a plenary lecture at MS&T in October.

Want to promote diversity in science? Offer better support.

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 15 March 2022

Growing up in Patna, India, I imagined that there would be a better representation of women in physics in the United States. But after arriving at the University of California, Santa Barbara, to begin my graduate studies in 1988, I was sorely disappointed to learn that I was the only woman in a class of 36 PhD students.

The situation has improved marginally since then. In 2019, for example, women received 20% of both undergraduate and PhD degrees in physics in the . . .

 

Vincent Sokalski receive grant for AMPED Consortium

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 15 February 2022

Congratulations to Vincent Sokalski for winning a grant for the AMPED Consortium. Read the CMU MSE article below! 

McHenry, Sokalski receive planning grant for Advanced Magnetics for Power and Energy Development (AMPED) Consortium. The Advanced Magnetics for Power and Energy Development (AMPED) Consortium has received a planning grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through its prestigious Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC).

University of Pittsburgh researchers develop new modular-based system for quantum computers

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 2 February 2022

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have successfully developed and patented a new modular-based system for connecting together qubits — a unit of measurement and a building block behind quantum computing.

In modern computing, computers use bits of information to solve problems, amid a myriad of other applications that computers can do. The bits that make up modern computers consist of ones and zeros, a signal that translates to being either on and off.

 

PQI Seminar: Dr. Mario Hofmann, Dr. Ya-Ping Hsieh

Dr. Mario Hofmann and Dr. Ya-Ping Hsieh from the National Taiwan University and Academia Sinica gave a talk titled "Why and How to Integrate 2D Materials in Future Electronics" in the Pittsburgh Quantum Institute Fall Seminar series on Nov. 17th, 2020.

Abstract: 2D materials are atomically thin nanostructures that are considered enabling elements in future electronics due to their unique geometry and exciting physical properties. To realize such applications, however, challenges in materials quality and production have to be addressed. In this talk we will first introduce a novel growth method that can enhance the scale, reliability, and controllability of 2D materials synthesis. Through control of the gas phase kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition process, efficient 2D materials growth could be achieved in atomically confined conditions. This advance permits the synthesis of 2D materials, such as graphene and TMDCs, at unprecedented scale and at crystalline qualities that rival exfoliated materials. Moreover, synthesis in the van-der-Waals gap of a host 2D material is demonstrated to facilitate a novel 2D crystallization process that yields novel transition-metal monochalcogenides with unexpected thermodynamic properties and finely adjustable thickness. Finally, the atomic length scales in confined growth enable controllable multi-precursor synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor 2D materials. The high quality of thus grown materials reveal novel interfacial ordering effects of 2D materials that are fundamentally different from bulk and present both challenges and opportunities towards their integration in electronics. Organization of ionic impurities on high quality graphene was shown to introduce a novel scattering process, that modulates graphene’s mobility by six times and is independent of charge concentration, necessitating improvements in materials’ characterization and handling. On the other hand, ordering effects at 2D materials interfaces can provide routes towards enhanced fabrication and performance of electronic devices. Interaction of graphene surfaces with gaseous adsorbates was shown to stabilize graphene in chemical reactions, permitting atomic-precision lithography approaches for large-scale semiconductor fabrication. Finally, assembly of monolayer water films on graphene under nanomechanical confinement was shown to produce a novel ferroelectric ice phase that can be exploited in mechanical memristive devices.

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