In the news

Farnam Jahanian Named President of Carnegie Mellon University

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 13 March 2018

Farnam Jahanian, the nationally recognized computer scientist, successful entrepreneur, senior public servant and respected leader in higher education, has been appointed as the 10th president of Carnegie Mellon University. The appointment is effective immediately, with a formal inauguration scheduled for fall 2018.

Jahanian holds a master's degree and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin. He is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

He currently serves as chair of the National Research Council's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB), sits on the executive committee of the Council on Competitiveness, and is a trustee of the Dietrich Foundation. He also is a board member of the Computing Research Association (CRA), the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM) Institute, and the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, among others.

 

Jim Bain named ECE's new Associate Department Head for Academic Affairs

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 28 February 2018

 James Bain was recently named ECE's new Associate Department Head for Academic Affairs, effective June 1, 2018. In his new role, Bain will extend his work with the Graduate Studies Committee to the entire student body and play a vital role in establishing ECE's long-term educational strategy.

Congratulations!

Peng Liu receives the 2018 Award in Early Excellence in Physical Organic Chemistry

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 28 February 2018

Peng Liu has been named the winner of the 2018 Award in Early Excellence in Physical Organic Chemistry, sponsored by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.  The award presentation will take place at the Reaction Mechanisms Conference, to be held at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, June 10-13, 2018, where he will receive the honorarium of $5000 and a plaque.

Congratulations!
 

Frolov and Team Featured on Pitt Website

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 12 January 2018

PQI Members Sergey Frolov, David Pekker, Noa Marom, Michael Hatridge, Benjamin Hunt, and Hrvoje Petek featured on Pitt Website for their accomplisment on landing $4.8M award from National Science Foundation (NSF) for International Research and Education (PIRE) program.Sergey Frolov will be the Director of new PIRE.  Hrvoje Petek, Michael Hatridge and David Pekker are other PQI co-PIs for this project. The duration of the program is 5 years.

Ken Jordan Serves as Guest Editor of Journal of Chemical Physics Special Issue

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 2 June 2021

Ken Jordan served as a guest editor for a special issue of the Journal of Chemical Physics titled “Frontiers of stochastic electronic structure calculations.” Read part of the abstract below.

Abstract:
In recent years there has been a rapid growth in the development and application of new stochastic methods in electronic structure. These methods are quite diverse, from many-body wave function techniques in real space or determinant space to being used to sum perturbative expansions. This growth has been spurred by the more favorable scaling with the number of electrons and often better parallelization over large numbers of central processing unit (CPU) cores or graphical processing units (GPUs) than for high-end non-stochastic wave function based methods. This special issue of the Journal of Chemical Physics includes 33 papers that describe recent developments and applications in this area. As seen from the articles in the issue, stochastic electronic structure methods are applicable to both molecules and solids and can accurately describe systems with strong electron correlation.

The special issue tackles six subtopics: auxiliary-field quantum monte carlo, real-space methods, perturbation theory, quantum chemistry methods, application to finite systems, and application to infinite systems. Read more here.

Publication Selected as Editor's Choice by APS Physics

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 4 May 2021

Congratulations to Hrvoje Petek and his team for their paper “Plasmonically assisted channels of photoemission from metals,” which was recently selected as an Editor’s Choice by APS Physics! Their research focuses on nonlinear photoemission spectra from Ag surfaces and single- and multiplasmon excitations. Check out the abstract here

 

 

Research Group to Create One-Dimensional Lattice for Electrons

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 20 April 2021

A team of researchers led by Jeremy Levy and several PQI members recently published a paper in Nature describing how the Kronig-Penney model is reproduced within a programmable oxide material. Introduced in 1931, this model shaped our understanding of materials that are used to create computers and other technology. 

Using an atomic force microscope, lead author Megan Briggeman created an artificial one-dimensional lattice of buckets and discovered that placing electrons in it caused them to interact in unexpected ways. In some sense, they acted as though the charge carriers were fractions of an electron. The observed behavior extends far beyond the simple Kronig-Penney model and appears in the real system, which contains hundreds of electrons.

The research was part of a larger effort to produce new electronic states of matter that may be helpful in developing future technologies such as quantum computers.

Congrats Jeremy, Megan, and team!
 

Grant Received for Studying Material Stability

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 31 March 2021

Olexandr Isayev, Geoff Hutchison, and their team of researchers received a $1.7 million grant from the Department of Defense’s Office of Naval Research for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative. Their project aims to gain a better understanding of how organic molecules and polymeric materials degrade under stress. Isayev’s lab plans to develop a computational framework using fast simulations for degradation pathways, reaction networks and artificial intelligence. Hutchison’s lab will use a variety of methods to make massive automated quantum chemical calculations. The results will not only allow future materials to be better designed for stability, but also offer tools that will help chemists and materials scientists quickly predict degradation pathways and products.

Congrats Olexandr and Geoff!

 

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