Physics

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and Dept. of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University
Ph.D. in Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 1992
Summary:

Dr. Nicholas A. (Nick) Nystrom is the chief scientist of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), a national computing center founded 1986 that is a joint effort of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. He joined PSC in 1992 as scientific programmer. He most recently served as interim director and senior research director. He has held the position of research physicist at Carnegie Mellon University since 2004. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1992 from the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Nystorm is the architect, principal investigator (PI), and project director (PD) for “Bridges”, PSC’s flagship platform that was the first to successfully converge HPC, AI, and Big Data. He is also PI for the Data Exacell, a research pilot for enabling high performance data analytics on novel storage; co-PI for Open Compass, which brings emerging AI technologies to important problems in research; co-I for the Center for Causal Discovery, an NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center of Excellence; and co-I for Big Data for Better Health, which applies machine learning to lung and breast cancer research.

Dr. Nystorm's research interest includes data analytics, Big Data, causal modeling, graph algorithms, genomics, machine learning / deep learning, extreme scalability, hardware and software architecture, software engineering for HPC, performance modeling and prediction, impacts of programming models and languages on productivity and efficiency, information visualization, and quantum chemistry. Recent work has focused on enabling data-intensive research in domains new to HPC, scaling diverse computational science codes and workflows to extreme-scale systems, deep hierarchies of parallelism, advanced filesystems, and architectural innovations in processors and interconnects.

Most Cited Publications
  • "Identifying driver genomic alterations in cancers by searching minimum-weight, mutually exclusive sets," Lu, S., Lu, K., Cheng, S.-Y., (...), Nystrom, N., Lu, X., BIBM (2015).
  • "Bridges: A uniquely flexible HPC resource for new communities and data analytics," Nystrom, N.A., Levine, M.J., Roskies, R.Z., Scott, J.R., International Conference Proceeding Series (2015).
  • "Porting third-party applications packages to the Cray T3D: Programming issues and scalability results," Wimberly, F.C., Lambert, M.H., Nystrom, N.A., Ropelewski, A., Young, W., Parallel Computing (1996).
Recent Publications
  • "Identifying driver genomic alterations in cancers by searching minimum-weight, mutually exclusive sets," Lu, S., Lu, K., Cheng, S.-Y., (...), Nystrom, N., Lu, X., BIBM (2015).
  • "Bridges: A uniquely flexible HPC resource for new communities and data analytics," Nystrom, N.A., Levine, M.J., Roskies, R.Z., Scott, J.R., International Conference Proceeding Series (2015).
  • "Porting third-party applications packages to the Cray T3D: Programming issues and scalability results," Wimberly, F.C., Lambert, M.H., Nystrom, N.A., Ropelewski, A., Young, W., Parallel Computing (1996).
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D. Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 2009
Summary:

Dr. Purdy is interested in harnessing the quantum effects intrinsic in the mechanical interaction of light with macroscopic mechanical resonators to improve measurement and metrology. Previously, Dr. Purdy worked as a physicist in the Quantum Optics Group, Quantum Measurement Division, PML at NIST. Before joining NIST, Dr. Purdy has worked on a wide variety of optomechanical systems as a postdoctoral researcher at JILA and in his graduate work at UC Berkeley.

Most Cited Publications
  1. Andrews, Reed W., Robert W. Peterson, Tom P. Purdy, Katarina Cicak, Raymond W. Simmonds, Cindy A. Regal, and Konrad W. Lehnert. "Bidirectional and efficient conversion between microwave and optical light." Nature Physics 10, no. 4 (2014): 321.
  2. Gupta, S., K. W. Murch, K. L. Moore, T. P. Purdy, and D. M. Stamper-Kurn. "Bose-Einstein condensation in a circular waveguide." Physical review letters 95, no. 14 (2005): 143201.
  3. Purdy, Tom P., Robert W. Peterson, and C. A. Regal. "Observation of radiation pressure shot noise on a macroscopic object." Science 339, no. 6121 (2013): 801-804.
  4. Purdy, Thomas P., P-L. Yu, R. W. Peterson, N. S. Kampel, and C. A. Regal. "Strong optomechanical squeezing of light." Physical Review X 3, no. 3 (2013): 031012.
  5. Brooks, Daniel WC, Thierry Botter, Sydney Schreppler, Thomas P. Purdy, Nathan Brahms, and Dan M. Stamper-Kurn. "Non-classical light generated by quantum-noise-driven cavity optomechanics." Nature 488, no. 7412 (2012): 476.
Recent Publications
  1. "Measuring Thermal Acoustic Radiation with an Optomechanical Antenna." Singh, Robinjeet, and Thomas P. Purdy. In 2018 IEEE Photonics Conference (IPC), pp. 1-2. IEEE, 2018.
  2. "Optomechanical Quantum Thermometry." Purdy, T.P., Singh, R., Klimov, N.N., (...), Srinivasan, K., Taylor, J.M. 2018 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO (2018).
  3. "Towards replacing resistance thermometry with photonic thermometry."     Klimov, N., Purdy, T., Ahmed, Z. Sensors and Actuators, A: Physical 269. (2018).
  4. "Quantum-based vacuum metrology at the National Institute of Standards and Technology." Scherschligt, Julia, James A. Fedchak, Zeeshan Ahmed, Daniel S. Barker, Kevin Douglass, Stephen Eckel, Edward Hanson et al. Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films 36, no. 4 (2018): 040801.
  5. "Quantum correlations from a room-temperature optomechanical cavity." Purdy, T. P., K. E. Grutter, K. Srinivasan, and J. M. Taylor. Science 356, no. 6344 (2017): 1265-1268.
Bar-Ilan University
Physics
Summary:

Research

National Institute of Standards and Technology
Ph. D. Physics, Cornell University
Summary:

The Group’s research includes nanoscale characterization of light-matter interaction, charge and energy transfer processes, catalytic activity and interfacial structure in energy-related materials and devices.  The current focus is on the creation of instrumentation for nanoscale characterization of photovoltaic and thermoelectric materials and devices and computational models of energy and charge transfer dynamics.

Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University
Ph.D. Physics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2010
Summary:

Dr. Yalcin's research involves understanding the components and pathways involved in biological electron transfer in conductive proteins. In addition, she is interested in studying microbe-mineral interactions using high resolution imaging tools.

Department of Physics, Ohio State University
Ph.D. Theoretical Condensed Matter, Cornell University, 1987
Summary:

The research in Professor Nandini Trivedi’s group focuses on the effects of strong interactions in condensed matter systems and ultracold atoms in optical lattices. The basic idea is to understand how electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how new phases of matter emerge. For example, we examine quantum phase transitions between superfluids and Mott insulators in optical lattices and also how fermions become entangled into novel spin liquid states.

Websites: 
Mundy Group
Department of Physics, Harvard University
Ph.D. Applied Physics, Cornell University, 2014
Summary:

Materials systems with many strongly interacting degrees of freedom can host some of the most exotic physical states known, ranging from superconductivity to topological phases. 

One of the hallmarks of these quantum materials is the ability for a small perturbation to dramatically change the ground state. In thin films, the interface between two distinct materials forms a playground to engineer such emergent states. Specifically—and in contrast to bulk crystals—such an abrupt heterointerface can utilize the broken symmetry/reduced dimensionality inherent to the interface as well as induce chemical potential offsets, epitaxial strain and provide proximity to functional phases. 

Work in the Mundy group will design, synthesize and probe such emergent phenomena in complex oxide thin films. Initial efforts will be particularly focused on using thin film epitaxy to construct metastable materials, with an emphasis on materials with strong spin frustration/exotic magnetic properties and novel superconductors. 

Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering, Chicago State University
Ph.D. Applied Physics, Southern Illinois University, 2017
Summary:

Russell Ceballos currently works in the Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering Studies at Chicago State University. Russell does research in the Theory of Open Quantum Systems and Quantum Biophysics.

Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego
Ph.D. Physics, Harvard University, 2016
Summary:

Our group performs nanoscale imaging and electronic device measurements to study the fundamental properties of quantum materials.

Phone: 
Websites: 
Liquid Group
Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University
PhD in Physics, University of Central Florida, 2013
Summary:

I am interested in investigating the electronic, optical and spin dependent properties of novel quantum materials like two-dimensional materials and their devices. I have expertise in controlling the properties of 2D materials using atomic scale modifications (adatoms, hetero-structures, proximity effects, etc.) with an intent to tweak their properties on demand, as well as explore novel physical phenomenons emerging due to such modifications. To achieve this, my research focuses on growth of novel quantum materials using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques and state-of-the-art characterization tools. We utilize a unique in-situ low temperature ultra-high vacuum magneto-transport measurement setup with capabilities to evaporate controlled amount of adatoms, and simultaneously perform quantum transport, Raman and photoluminsence spectroscopy on devices. In addition, we study the electronic band structure of mesoscopic sized quantum materials and devices using in-operando NanoARPES with a spatial resolution reaching upto 50 nm at MASTERO beamline in Advanced light source.

Most Cited Publications
  1. "Hofstadter’s butterfly and the fractal quantum Hall effect in moire´ superlattices," C. R. Dean, L. Wang, P. Maher, C. Forsythe, F. Ghahari, Y. Gao, J. Katoch, M. Ishigami, P. Moon5 , M. Koshino, T. Taniguchi, K. Watanabe, K. L. Shepard, J. Hone & P. Kim, NATURE 497, 598 (2013).
  2. "Effects of Layer Stacking on the Combination Raman Modes in Graphene," Rahul Rao, Ramakrishna Podila, Ryuichi Tsuchikawa, Jyoti Katoch, Derek Tishler, Apparao M. Rao, and Masa Ishigami, ACS Nano 5, 1594 (2011).
  3. "Structure of a Peptide Adsorbed on Graphene and Graphite," Jyoti Katoch, Sang Nyon Kim, Zhifeng Kuang, Barry L. Farmer, Rajesh R. Naik, Suren A. Tatulian, and Masa Ishigami, Nano Lett.,12, 2342 (2012).
  4. "Uncovering the dominant scatterer in graphene sheets on SiO2," Jyoti Katoch, J.-H. Chen, Ryuichi Tsuchikawa, C. W. Smith, E. R. Mucciolo, and Masa Ishigami, PHYSICAL REVIEW B 82, 081417 (2010).
  5. "Strong Modulation of Spin Currents in Bilayer Graphene by Static and Fluctuating Proximity Exchange Fields," Simranjeet Singh, Jyoti Katoch, Tiancong Zhu, Keng-Yuan Meng, Tianyu Liu, Jack T. Brangham, Fengyuan Yang, Michael E. Flatté, and Roland K. Kawakami, PRL 118, 187201 (2017).
Recent Publications
  1. "Transport Spectroscopy of Sublattice-Resolved Resonant Scattering in Hydrogen-Doped Bilayer Graphene," Jyoti Katoch, Tiancong Zhu, Denis Kochan, Simranjeet Singh, Jaroslav Fabian, and Roland K. Kawakami, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 121, 136801 (2018).
  2. "Electronic structure of exfoliated and epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride." Koch, Roland J., Jyoti Katoch, Simon Moser, Daniel Schwarz, Roland K. Kawakami, Aaron Bostwick, Eli Rotenberg, Chris Jozwiak, and Søren Ulstrup. Physical Review Materials 2, no. 7 (2018): 074006.
  3. "Probing Tunneling Spin Injection into Graphene via Bias Dependence." Zhu, Tiancong, Simranjeet Singh, Jyoti Katoch, Hua Wen, Kirill Belashchenko, Igor Žutić, and Roland K. Kawakami. arXiv preprint arXiv:1806.06526 (2018).
  4. "Giant spin-splitting and gap renormalization driven by trions in single-layer WS2/h-BN heterostructures," Jyoti Katoch , Søren Ulstrup , Roland J. Koch , Simon Moser , Kathleen M. McCreary , Simranjeet Singh, Jinsong Xu, Berend T. Jonker , Roland K. Kawakami , Aaron Bostwick, Eli Rotenberg  and Chris Jozwiak , Nature Physics 14, 355 (2018).
  5. "Spin inversion in graphene spin valves by gate-tunable magnetic proximity effect at one-dimensional contacts." Xu, Jinsong, Simranjeet Singh, Jyoti Katoch, Guanzhong Wu, Tiancong Zhu, Igor Zutic, and Roland K. Kawakami. arXiv preprint arXiv:1802.07790 (2018).

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