Physics

Phone: 
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh
PhD., Caltech
Summary:

My research interests centers on the strong and weak interactions of the Standard Model. In particular, I use effective field theory techniques to study heavy quarks as a probe of these interactions, and to try to uncover physics beyond the Standard Model. I am also interested in gravitational waves, the physics of extra dimensions, supersymmetry, in matter at extreme densities, and on physics relevant to the Large Hadron Collider. 

Most Cited Publications
  • “Color octet quarkonia production,” P. L. Cho and A. K. Leibovich, Phys. Rev. D 53, 150 (1996)
  • “Color cote quarkonia production 2,” P. L. Cho and A. K. Leibovich, Phys. Rev. D 53, 6203 (1996)
  • “Semileptonic B decays to excited charmed mesons,” A. K. Leibovich, Z. Ligeti, I. W. Stewart, and M. B. Wise, Phys. Rev. D 57, 308 (1998)
  • "Extracting V_{ub} without recourse to structure functions,” A. K. Leibovich, I. Low, and I. Z. Rothstein, Phys. Rev. D 61, 053006 (2000)
  • “NRQCD analysis of bottomonium production at the Tevatron,” E. Braaten, S. Fleming, and A. K. Leibovich, Phys. Rev. D. 63, 094006 (2001)
Recent Publications
  • “Universal lepton universality violation in exclusive processes,” L. Dai, C. Kim, and A. K. Leibovich, Phys. Rev. D 105 3, L031301 (2022)
  • “Heavy quark jet production near threshold,” L. Dai, C. Kim, and A. K. Leibovich, JHEP 09, 148 (2021)
  • “Second post-Newtonian order radiative dynamics of inspiralling compact binaries in the Effective Field Theory approach,” A. K. Leibovich, N. T. Maia, I. Z. Rothstein, and Z. Yang, Phys. Rev. D 101, 8, 084058 (2020)
  • "Analytic solutions to compact binary inspires with leading order spin-orbit contribution using the dynamical renormalization group,” Z. Yang and A. K. Leibovich, Phys. Rev. D 100, 8, 084021 (2019)
  • ”Heavy quark jet fragmentation,” L. Dai, C. Kim, and A. K. Leibovich, JHEP 09, 109 (2018)
Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2019
Summary:

My research interests cover a number of topics in condensed matter physics, with a particular emphasis on topological or otherwise exotic superconductivity and strongly interacting topological systems. Recently, my main research efforts were focused on the search of the microscopic origin and novel properties of topological superconductors, transport and optical properties of interacting topological materials, and hydrodynamics of electrons. In my work, I aim to address both questions of fundamental importance and those having a clear connection to existing or ongoing experiments; many of my works were inspired by or eventually related to certain experimental findings.

Most Cited Publications
  1. "Odd-parity superconductivity in the vicinity of inversion symmetry breaking in spin-orbit-coupled systems." Vladyslav Kozii, Liang Fu. Phys. Rev. Lett. (2015).
  2. "Odd-parity superconductors with two-component order parameters: Nematic and chiral, full gap, and Majorana node." Jörn WF Venderbos, Vladyslav Kozii, Liang Fu. Physical Review B (2016). 
  3. "Non-Hermitian topological theory of finite-lifetime quasiparticles: prediction of bulk Fermi arc due to exceptional point." Vladyslav Kozii, Liang Fu. arXiv preprint arXiv:1708.05841 (2017).
  4. "Identification of nematic superconductivity from the upper critical field." Jörn WF Venderbos, Vladyslav Kozii, Liang Fu. Physical Review B (2016).
  5. "Nematic superconductivity stabilized by density wave fluctuations: Possible application to twisted bilayer graphene." Vladyslav Kozii, Hiroki Isobe, Jörn WF Venderbos, Liang Fu. Physical Review B (2019). 
Recent Publications
  1. "Superconductivity in low-density Dirac materials." Vladyslav KoziiBulletin of the American Physical Society (2022).
  2. "Synergetic ferroelectricity and superconductivity in zero-density Dirac semimetals near quantum criticality." Vladyslav Kozii, Avraham Klein, Rafael M Fernandes, Jonathan Ruhman. arXiv preprint arXiv:2110.09530 (2021).
  3. "Direct Geometric Probe of Singularities in Band Structure." Charles D Brown, Shao-Wen Chang, Malte N Schwarz, Tsz-Him Leung, Vladyslav Kozii, Alexander Avdoshkin, Joel E Moore, Dan Stamper-Kurn. arXiv preprint arXiv:2109.03354 (2021).
  4. "Intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity in a nonuniform electric field." Vladyslav Kozii, Alexander Avdoshkin, Shudan Zhong, Joel E Moore. Physical review letters (2021).
  5. "Quantized thermoelectric Hall effect induces giant power factor in a topological semimetal." Fei Han, Nina Andrejevic, Thanh Nguyen, Vladyslav Kozii, Quynh T Nguyen, Tom Hogan, Zhiwei Ding, Ricardo Pablo-Pedro, Shreya Parjan, Brian Skinner, Ahmet Alatas, Ercan Alp, Songxue Chi, Jaime Fernandez-Baca, Shengxi Huang, Liang Fu, Mingda Li. Nature communications (2020). 
Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center and Dept. of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University
Ph.D. in Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 1992
Summary:

Dr. Nicholas A. (Nick) Nystrom is the chief scientist of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), a national computing center founded 1986 that is a joint effort of Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. He joined PSC in 1992 as scientific programmer. He most recently served as interim director and senior research director. He has held the position of research physicist at Carnegie Mellon University since 2004. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1992 from the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Nystorm is the architect, principal investigator (PI), and project director (PD) for “Bridges”, PSC’s flagship platform that was the first to successfully converge HPC, AI, and Big Data. He is also PI for the Data Exacell, a research pilot for enabling high performance data analytics on novel storage; co-PI for Open Compass, which brings emerging AI technologies to important problems in research; co-I for the Center for Causal Discovery, an NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) Center of Excellence; and co-I for Big Data for Better Health, which applies machine learning to lung and breast cancer research.

Dr. Nystorm's research interest includes data analytics, Big Data, causal modeling, graph algorithms, genomics, machine learning / deep learning, extreme scalability, hardware and software architecture, software engineering for HPC, performance modeling and prediction, impacts of programming models and languages on productivity and efficiency, information visualization, and quantum chemistry. Recent work has focused on enabling data-intensive research in domains new to HPC, scaling diverse computational science codes and workflows to extreme-scale systems, deep hierarchies of parallelism, advanced filesystems, and architectural innovations in processors and interconnects.

Most Cited Publications
  • "Identifying driver genomic alterations in cancers by searching minimum-weight, mutually exclusive sets," Lu, S., Lu, K., Cheng, S.-Y., (...), Nystrom, N., Lu, X., BIBM (2015).
  • "Bridges: A uniquely flexible HPC resource for new communities and data analytics," Nystrom, N.A., Levine, M.J., Roskies, R.Z., Scott, J.R., International Conference Proceeding Series (2015).
  • "Porting third-party applications packages to the Cray T3D: Programming issues and scalability results," Wimberly, F.C., Lambert, M.H., Nystrom, N.A., Ropelewski, A., Young, W., Parallel Computing (1996).
Recent Publications
  • "Identifying driver genomic alterations in cancers by searching minimum-weight, mutually exclusive sets," Lu, S., Lu, K., Cheng, S.-Y., (...), Nystrom, N., Lu, X., BIBM (2015).
  • "Bridges: A uniquely flexible HPC resource for new communities and data analytics," Nystrom, N.A., Levine, M.J., Roskies, R.Z., Scott, J.R., International Conference Proceeding Series (2015).
  • "Porting third-party applications packages to the Cray T3D: Programming issues and scalability results," Wimberly, F.C., Lambert, M.H., Nystrom, N.A., Ropelewski, A., Young, W., Parallel Computing (1996).
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D. Physics, University of California, Berkeley, 2009
Summary:

Dr. Purdy is interested in harnessing the quantum effects intrinsic in the mechanical interaction of light with macroscopic mechanical resonators to improve measurement and metrology. Previously, Dr. Purdy worked as a physicist in the Quantum Optics Group, Quantum Measurement Division, PML at NIST. Before joining NIST, Dr. Purdy has worked on a wide variety of optomechanical systems as a postdoctoral researcher at JILA and in his graduate work at UC Berkeley.

Most Cited Publications
  1. Andrews, Reed W., Robert W. Peterson, Tom P. Purdy, Katarina Cicak, Raymond W. Simmonds, Cindy A. Regal, and Konrad W. Lehnert. "Bidirectional and efficient conversion between microwave and optical light." Nature Physics 10, no. 4 (2014): 321.
  2. Gupta, S., K. W. Murch, K. L. Moore, T. P. Purdy, and D. M. Stamper-Kurn. "Bose-Einstein condensation in a circular waveguide." Physical review letters 95, no. 14 (2005): 143201.
  3. Purdy, Tom P., Robert W. Peterson, and C. A. Regal. "Observation of radiation pressure shot noise on a macroscopic object." Science 339, no. 6121 (2013): 801-804.
  4. Purdy, Thomas P., P-L. Yu, R. W. Peterson, N. S. Kampel, and C. A. Regal. "Strong optomechanical squeezing of light." Physical Review X 3, no. 3 (2013): 031012.
  5. Brooks, Daniel WC, Thierry Botter, Sydney Schreppler, Thomas P. Purdy, Nathan Brahms, and Dan M. Stamper-Kurn. "Non-classical light generated by quantum-noise-driven cavity optomechanics." Nature 488, no. 7412 (2012): 476.
Recent Publications
  1. "Measuring Thermal Acoustic Radiation with an Optomechanical Antenna." Singh, Robinjeet, and Thomas P. Purdy. In 2018 IEEE Photonics Conference (IPC), pp. 1-2. IEEE, 2018.
  2. "Optomechanical Quantum Thermometry." Purdy, T.P., Singh, R., Klimov, N.N., (...), Srinivasan, K., Taylor, J.M. 2018 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO (2018).
  3. "Towards replacing resistance thermometry with photonic thermometry."     Klimov, N., Purdy, T., Ahmed, Z. Sensors and Actuators, A: Physical 269. (2018).
  4. "Quantum-based vacuum metrology at the National Institute of Standards and Technology." Scherschligt, Julia, James A. Fedchak, Zeeshan Ahmed, Daniel S. Barker, Kevin Douglass, Stephen Eckel, Edward Hanson et al. Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films 36, no. 4 (2018): 040801.
  5. "Quantum correlations from a room-temperature optomechanical cavity." Purdy, T. P., K. E. Grutter, K. Srinivasan, and J. M. Taylor. Science 356, no. 6344 (2017): 1265-1268.
Bar-Ilan University
Physics
Summary:

Research

National Institute of Standards and Technology
Ph. D. Physics, Cornell University
Summary:

The Group’s research includes nanoscale characterization of light-matter interaction, charge and energy transfer processes, catalytic activity and interfacial structure in energy-related materials and devices.  The current focus is on the creation of instrumentation for nanoscale characterization of photovoltaic and thermoelectric materials and devices and computational models of energy and charge transfer dynamics.

Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University
Ph.D. Physics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2010
Summary:

Dr. Yalcin's research involves understanding the components and pathways involved in biological electron transfer in conductive proteins. In addition, she is interested in studying microbe-mineral interactions using high resolution imaging tools.

Department of Physics, Ohio State University
Ph.D. Theoretical Condensed Matter, Cornell University, 1987
Summary:

The research in Professor Nandini Trivedi’s group focuses on the effects of strong interactions in condensed matter systems and ultracold atoms in optical lattices. The basic idea is to understand how electrons and atoms get organized at very low temperatures and how new phases of matter emerge. For example, we examine quantum phase transitions between superfluids and Mott insulators in optical lattices and also how fermions become entangled into novel spin liquid states.

Websites: 
Mundy Group
Department of Physics, Harvard University
Ph.D. Applied Physics, Cornell University, 2014
Summary:

Materials systems with many strongly interacting degrees of freedom can host some of the most exotic physical states known, ranging from superconductivity to topological phases. 

One of the hallmarks of these quantum materials is the ability for a small perturbation to dramatically change the ground state. In thin films, the interface between two distinct materials forms a playground to engineer such emergent states. Specifically—and in contrast to bulk crystals—such an abrupt heterointerface can utilize the broken symmetry/reduced dimensionality inherent to the interface as well as induce chemical potential offsets, epitaxial strain and provide proximity to functional phases. 

Work in the Mundy group will design, synthesize and probe such emergent phenomena in complex oxide thin films. Initial efforts will be particularly focused on using thin film epitaxy to construct metastable materials, with an emphasis on materials with strong spin frustration/exotic magnetic properties and novel superconductors. 

Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering, Chicago State University
Ph.D. Applied Physics, Southern Illinois University, 2017
Summary:

Russell Ceballos currently works in the Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering Studies at Chicago State University. Russell does research in the Theory of Open Quantum Systems and Quantum Biophysics.

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