Quantum technology

Interview with Dr. Pedram Roushan

Pedram Roushan was born and raised in Iran. In 2001, he moved to the US as a religious refugee and attended Pitt, where he graduated summa cum laude in 2005. During his years at Pitt, he worked at the laboratories of X. L. Wu and W. Goldberg, focusing on the dynamics in 2D fluids. He received his PhD in 2011 from Princeton University, performing the first scanning tunneling microscopy on the surface of topological insulators in the lab of A. Yazdani. After three years of post-doctoral studies in the J. Martinis lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2014 he joined the Google quantum hardware lab aiming on making a quantum computer. The current focus of his research is on simulating condensed matter systems with engineered quantum platforms.

Interview with Dr. Pedram Roushan

Speaker(s): 
Pedram Roushan
Dates: 
Friday, December 1, 2017 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Pedram Roushan was born and raised in Iran. In 2001, he moved to the US as a religious refugee and attended Pitt, where he graduated summa cum laude in 2005. During his years at Pitt, he worked at the laboratories of X. L. Wu and W. Goldberg, focusing on the dynamics in 2D fluids. He received his PhD in 2011 from Princeton University, performing the first scanning tunneling microscopy on the surface of topological insulators in the lab of A. Yazdani. After three years of post-doctoral studies in the J. Martinis lab at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2014 he joined the Google quantum hardware lab aiming on making a quantum computer. The current focus of his research is on simulating condensed matter systems with engineered quantum platforms.

RFI: Cross Quantum Technology Systems

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 11 July 2016

The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Research Triangle Park Division is issuing this Request for Information (RFI) in support of the U.S. Army Research Office (ARO) and the Laboratory of Physical Sciences (LPS) in seeking information on emerging concepts and approaches for cross‐quantum‐technology systems (CQTS) that may provide a path to significantly improve the performance and functionality of individual qubit types beyond approaches focused solely on the individual qubit type. These concepts and approaches combine (hybridize) qubit types to compensate for an inadequacy in the primary qubit system, significantly improving performance of the primary qubit, or which enables new functionality in the primary qubit. This includes highly efficient, low power classical information transfer between operating domains of qubits.