Seminar

Laura Ruetsche (University of Michigan)

Speaker(s): 
Laura Ruetsche
Dates: 
Friday, November 8, 2019 - 3:30pm

Speaker biography: Laura Ruetsche's research focuses on the foundations of physical theories, particularly quantum theories. Her book Interpreting Quantum Theories (Oxford), published in May 2011, was a co-winner of the 2013 Lakatos Award in philosophy of science. The book aims to use peculiar features of quantum field theories to challenge entrenched accounts of what a quantum theory is and how a physical theory comes to be associated with a collection of worlds that are by its lights possible.

Artificial Atoms: Quantum Optics and Spin Physics of Quantum Dots

Speaker(s): 
Edward (Ned) Flagg
Dates: 
Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 4:00pm

Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanoscopic crystals that are often called artificial atoms. Charge carriers trapped within them have discrete energy levels in the fashion of single atoms, and they absorb and emit light at discrete wavelengths corresponding to those energy levels. Because of this, in many ways QDs behave like the canonical two-level quantum system, which makes them suitable for experiments involving the quantum nature of light, which is called quantum optics. For this reason and for their potential uses in quantum information applications, QDs attract great scientific...

Accelerating the Computational Discovery Of Catalyst Design Rules and Exceptions with Machine Learning

Speaker(s): 
Heather Kulik
Dates: 
Friday, September 13, 2019 - 9:30am

Over the past decade, first-principles computation has emerged as a powerful complement to experiment in the discovery of new catalysts and materials. In many cases, computation has excelled most in distilling rules for catalyst structure-property relationships in well defined spaces such as bulk metals into descriptors or linear free energy relationships. More development is needed of computational tools for them to show the same promise in emerging catalytic materials such as single-site metal-organic framework catalysts or single atom catalysts that have increased promise of atom...

Band Engineering for Quantum Simulation in Circuit QED

Speaker(s): 
Alicia Kollar
Dates: 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 - 4:00pm

The field of circuit QED has emerged as a rich platform for both quantum computation and quantum simulation. Lattices of coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators realize artificial photonic materials in the tight-binding limit. Combined with strong qubit-photon interactions, these systems can be used to study dynamical phase transitions, many-body phenomena, and spin models in driven-dissipative systems. I will show that these waveguide cavities are uniquely deformable and can produce lattices and networks which cannot readily be obtained in other systems, including periodic lattices in a...

Research Lecture: Fueling America’s Energy Future

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Brian J. Anderson
Dates: 
Thursday, June 13, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Brian J. Anderson, Ph.D., is director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Anderson manages the complete NETL complex, including delivery and execution of the Laboratory’s mission, and national programs in fossil energy. Anderson came to NETL from West Virginia University (WVU) where he served as the director of the WVU Energy Institute. He has a long history of collaboration with NETL and other DOE national laboratories. He served NETL as the coordinator of the International Methane Hydrate Reservoir Simulator Code Comparison study and in...

Benchmark NISQ Devices using State-of-the-art Classical Tools

Speaker(s): 
Salvatore Mandra
Dates: 
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 4:00pm

In the race to show quantum advantage, early Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) devices must be compared to the state-of-the-art classical technology currently available. At the Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab (QuAIL) at NASA Ames, we are continuously developing new classical algorithms to benchmark/validate quantum hardware and to raise the bar to claim quantum advantage. In my talk, I will present our optimized classical simulator for large quantum circuits, including numerical simulations of the Google Bristlecone quantum processing unit.

Quantum Computing based on Trapped Ion Technology

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Jungsang Kim
Dates: 
Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 12:00pm

Trapped ions are one of the leading candidates for realizing practically useful quantum computers. Introduction of advanced integration technologies to this traditional atomic physics research has provided an opportunity to convert a complex atomic physics experiment into a stand-alone programmable quantum computer. In this presentation, I will discuss the new enabling technologies that changes the perception of a trapped ion system as a scalable quantum computer, and the concrete progress made to date in this endeavor. I will also discuss potential application areas where quantum...

A look inside the black box of scientific publishing

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Matteo Cavalleri
Dates: 
Friday, March 15, 2019 - 10:00am

Publishing the results of one’s research is an integral part of the scientific process, yet scholarly journals are often seen as black boxes by researchers. What happens to a paper after it is submitted? Who is deciding on its fate? What is the role of the journal editor and the editorial office? How does the peer-review process work, and are its core principles still relevant in today’s changing publishing landscape? 
In this talk I will discuss these questions in an attempt to de-mystify the peer review process from an editor's perspective, and provide advice for getting your...

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