Seminar

Quantum LEGOs: Building large quantum systems atom-by-atom

Speaker(s): 
Hannes Bernien
Dates: 
Monday, February 5, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

The realization of large-scale controlled quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. In this talk, I will introduce a new approach based on cold atoms in arrays of optical tweezers. We use atom-by-atom assembly to deterministically prepare arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. A measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with the probabilistic trap loading and results in defect-free arrays of over 60 atoms [1]. Strong, coherent interactions are enabled by coupling to atomic Rydberg states. We realize a programmable Ising-type...

Lunch Talk: Peter Maurer

Speaker(s): 
Peter Maurer
Dates: 
Friday, February 9, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

Quantum optics has had a profound impact on precision measurements, and recently enabled probing various physical quantities, such as magnetic fields and temperature, with nanoscale spatial resolution. Such advancements in ‘quantum sensing’ have brought the elusive dream of performing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) on individual biomolecules closer to reality. In my talk, I will discuss the development and application of novel quantum metrological technologies to study biological systems at a single-molecule level. I will start with a general introduction...

Quantum sensing in a new single-molecule regime

Speaker(s): 
Peter Maurer
Dates: 
Thursday, February 8, 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Quantum optics has had a profound impact on precision measurements, and recently enabled probing various physical quantities, such as magnetic fields and temperature, with nanoscale spatial resolution. Such advancements in ‘quantum sensing’ have brought the elusive dream of performing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) on individual biomolecules closer to reality. In my talk, I will discuss the development and application of novel quantum metrological technologies to study biological systems at a single-molecule level. I will start with a general introduction...

Can Evolutionary Dynamics Be Understood Quantitatively?

Speaker(s): 
Daniel S. Fisher
Dates: 
Monday, February 5, 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

The basic laws of evolution have been known for more than a century and there is overwhelming evidence for the facts of evolution. Yet little is understood quantitatively about the dynamical  processes that drive evolution: by physicists' standards the theory of evolution is far from fully-fledged. Huge advances in DNA sequencing technology and laboratory experiments have enabled direct observations of evolution in action and, together with theoretical developments, opened up great opportunities for dramatically advancing our understanding. This talk will focus on framing...

Philip Feng (Case Western): Atomic Layer Semiconductor 2D Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS)

Atomically thin semiconducting crystals derived from new classes of layered materials have rapidly emerged to enable two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures with unusual electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties.  While graphene has been the forerunner and hallmark of 2D crystals, newly emerged 2D semiconductors offer intriguing, beyond-graphene, attributes.  The sizable and tunable bandgaps of compound and single-element 2D semiconductors offer attractive perspectives for strong multiphysics coupling and efficient transduction across various signal domains.  In this presentation, I will describe my research group’s latest efforts on investigating how mechanically active atomic layer semiconductors and their heterostructures interact with optical and electronic interrogations, and on engineering such structures into new ultrasensitive transducers and signal processing building blocks.  Using single- and few-layer transition metal di-chalcogenide (TMDC) crystals, we demonstrate multimode resonant 2D nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) with extraordinary electrical tunability.  We have also found remarkably broad dynamic range (DR~70 to 100dB) in these 2D NEMS, via deterministic measurement of device intrinsic noise floor and onset of nonlinearity.  I will describe spatial mapping and visualization of mode shapes and Brownian motion in these 2D multimode resonators, along with their applications in resolving intrinsic anisotropy and structural asymmetry.  I shall then discuss emerging device applications, from classical information processing technologies to 2D NEMS operating in their quantum regime. 

Lunch Talk: Kristen Beck

Speaker(s): 
Kristin Beck
Dates: 
Friday, January 12, 2018 - 12:00pm

Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for quantum computation, with optically-accessible qubit states with long coherence times and fidelities exceeding 99% [1]. This combination allows us to take advantage of coherence and entanglement--two distinctly quantum phenomena--to realize one- and two- qubit gates and to explore quantum algorithms that promise to scale better than their classical counterparts on particular problems like factoring large numbers [2]. In this talk, I will describe the trapped ion quantum computing architecture [3,4], share first signals from a...

Prototyping a Quantum Computer with Trapped Ions

Speaker(s): 
Kristin Beck
Dates: 
Thursday, January 11, 2018 - 4:00pm

Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for quantum computation, with optically-accessible qubit states with long coherence times and fidelities exceeding 99% [1]. This combination allows us to take advantage of coherence and entanglement--two distinctly quantum phenomena--to realize one- and two- qubit gates and to explore quantum algorithms that promise to scale better than their classical counterparts on particular problems like factoring large numbers [2]. In this talk, I will describe the trapped ion quantum computing architecture [3,4], share first signals from a...

Structure-Property Relationships in Nanostructured Materials: Aqueous Semiconductor Interfaces

Speaker(s): 
Mark S. Hybertsen
Dates: 
Friday, December 8, 2017 - 11:30am

Understanding structure-property relationships in fields as diverse as nanoscale electronic junctions, heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry and energy storage often starts by meeting the challenge of identifying key structure motifs. For the theorist this is followed by tackling the problem of calculating the relevant functional characteristics, also challenging, particularly for excited state properties. I will discuss the modern toolbox for these problems, including a brief outline of the basic physical ingredients of modern manybody perturbation theory which enables studies of excited state properties. I will then discuss its application in the context of the search to develop new materials for use in photocatalysis. In particular, I will discuss the search for key structural motifs at semiconductor-water interfaces and the connection to electrochemical energy level alignment. 

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