Spring 2018

Request for Information: Impacts From and to Quantum Information Science in High Energy Physics

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 24 January 2018

The Department of Energy is seeking input on how quantum information science could address the needs of high-energy physicists and vice versa. DOE would like specific information on “organizational and assessment considerations.” Submissions are due by February 12, 2018.

Interested persons may submit comments by email only. Comments must be sent to QISandHEP-RFI@science.doe.gov with the subject line “Quantum Information Science and HEP RFI”. Any attachments must be in one of the following formats: ASCII; Word; RTF; or PDF.

Deadline: February 12, 2018.

Quantum Phenomena in Two-Dimensional Materials Driven by Atomic Scale Modifications

Speaker(s): 
Jyoti Katoch
Dates: 
Monday, February 19, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

The extreme surface sensitivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials provides an unprecedented opportunity to engineer the physical properties of these materials via changes to their surroundings, including a substrate, adsorbates, defects, etc.  In particular, the decoration of the 2Dmaterial with adatoms can be utilized to tailor material properties and induce novel quantum phenomena. In this context, first I will discuss the case of 2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), wherein new electronic phenomena such as tunable bandgaps and strongly bound...

Current Instability in a Driven 2D Electron Liquid Probed by Nanoscale Magnetometry

Speaker(s): 
Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi
Dates: 
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

A moving fluid can become unstable in the presence of an obstruction, leading to a flow pattern that fluctuates in time due to nonlinear dynamics.  It has been recently found that some materials host electrons that behave like a collective fluid. In particular, experiments with graphene electrons have demonstrated linear hydrodynamic phenomena, such as viscous drag at sample boundaries, but nonlinear effects have yet to be reported.  We observe a AC current instability that develops when driving a DC current through a graphene device in the electron hydrodynamic regime...

Workshop on Electron Probe MicroAnalysis

Speaker(s): 
Vern Robertson, Peter McSwiggen
Dates: 
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 9:30am to 3:00pm

This workshop is sponsored by PINSE/NFCF, JEOL and Three Rivers Microscopy Society (3RMS).  

The workshop will provide an introduction to the world of electron microprobe and also cover some more advanced applications such as low keV analysis and effects of contamination.  Some of these topics are also of interest to EDS users. This workshop is for anyone, and we welcome those who have zero knowledge of EPMA but might be interested in applications to your own research.  EPMA is similar to EDS, but offers more elemental precision, with higher peak to background ratios and easier...

Finding Funding: Resources & Opportunities for New Researchers

Speaker(s): 
Ryan Champagne
Dates: 
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 10:00am to 11:00am

An introductory session to Pivot led by Ryan Champagne from the Office of Research and Robin Kear from the University Library System. The hands-on session will provide an overview of this resource and how it may be used to find funding and collaboration opportunities to support your research. Additional resources related to funding competitions coordinated within the University, as well as funding programs for early career faculty, will also be presented.

 

Susan Fullerton and colleagues are one of five winners of international circular materials challenge

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 24 January 2018

Each year more than eight million tons of plastics pollute the ocean, forming mammoth, so-called “garbage patches” via strong currents. Even with new collection methods, only 0.5 percent out of that volume is currently removed from the seas. One solution to this growing crisis is to prevent plastic from becoming waste, to begin with – and Susan Fullerton and colleagues are one of five international teams awarded for their novel solutions to this problem. The group was one of two winners in Category 1: “Make unrecyclable packaging recyclable,” and proposes using nano-engineering to create a recyclable material that can replace complex multi-layered packaging – mimicking the way nature uses just a few molecular building blocks to create a huge variety of materials.

Finding Funding: Resources & Opportunities for New Researchers

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 24 January 2018

An introductory session to Pivot led by Ryan Champagne from the Office of Research and Robin Kear from the University Library System. The hands-on session will provide an overview of this resource and how it may be used to find funding and collaboration opportunities to support your research. Additional resources related to funding competitions coordinated within the University, as well as funding programs for early career faculty, will also be presented.
Please bring a laptop or another device with Web access.​

Date:  Thursday, January 25, 2018
Location:  Hillman Library, Digital Scholarship Commons, G-49​
Register Here https://pitt.libcal.com/event/3808929

DARPA DSO Driven and Nonequilibrium Quantum Systems (DRINQS) Proposers Day

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 24 January 2018

The DRINQS Proposers Day will be webcast on February 1, 2018 from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM. Note, all times listed in this announcement and on the registration website are Eastern Time. There is no registration fee for the Proposers Day webcast. Registration opens: As of publication of this announcement. Registration website: http://www.cvent.com/d/3tq4sp  Registration closes: January 29, 2018 at 12:00 PM or when capacity is reached, whichever comes first. Advance registration via the above website is required in order to receive access to the webcast and is mandatory for every individual intending to view the webcast either alone or as part of a group

Pitt Seed Projects

  • By Burcu Ozden
  • 24 January 2018

This new initiative, funded through the office of the chancellor, broadens the ways in which you can directly and actively contribute to Pitt’s strategic transformation. At the same time, this initiative gives me an opportunity to identify and support some of the best and brightest ideas emerging from our own community.All faculty and staff members are eligible to apply for a Pitt Seed Project, which must support one or more of the six goals and strategies outlined in the Plan for Pitt. Chosen applicants can receive up to $50,000 to advance their project, and this call for submissions closes on March 5, 2018, by noon EST.

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