Spring 2021

Grant Received for Studying Material Stability

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 31 March 2021

Olexandr Isayev, Geoff Hutchison, and their team of researchers received a $1.7 million grant from the Department of Defense’s Office of Naval Research for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative. Their project aims to gain a better understanding of how organic molecules and polymeric materials degrade under stress. Isayev’s lab plans to develop a computational framework using fast simulations for degradation pathways, reaction networks and artificial intelligence. Hutchison’s lab will use a variety of methods to make massive automated quantum chemical calculations. The results will not only allow future materials to be better designed for stability, but also offer tools that will help chemists and materials scientists quickly predict degradation pathways and products.

Congrats Olexandr and Geoff!

 

Dr. Konstantinos Vogiatzis, University of Tennessee (CMU Chemistry Seminar)

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Konstantinos Vogiatzis
Dates: 
Wednesday, April 14, 2021 - 4:30pm

Coupling Electronic Structure Theory with Machine Learning for Chemical Applications

Abstract: Our recent efforts on the development of new computational methods that couple quantum chemistry with machine learning will be discussed. First, a novel molecular fingerprinting method based on persistent homology, an applied branch of topology, that can encode the geometric and electronic structure of molecules for chemical applications will be presented. We have demonstrated its applicability on studies on non-covalent interactions between functional...

Dr. Vlad Pribiag, UMN (STO Seminar)

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Vlad Pribiag
Dates: 
Friday, March 26, 2021 - 3:00pm

Title: Magnetic properties of NdTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and broader implications

Abstract: SrTiO3-based thin-film heterostructures are a powerful platform for studying a wide array of electronic phases in two dimensions, at high carrier densities. I will discuss our low-temperature electronic transport studies of NdTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces, which reveal an interplay between local ferromagnetic order, Kondo scattering and spin-orbit coupling. As the magnetic field angle is gradually tilted away from the sample normal,...

Dr. Beate Heinemann, DESY (Pitt/CMU Colloquium)

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Beate Heinemann
Dates: 
Monday, March 22, 2021 - 4:00pm

A new experiment to study non-perturbative QED in electron-LASER and photon-LASER collisions

Abstract: The LUXE experiment (LASER Und XFEL Experiment) is a new experiment in planning at DESY Hamburg using the electron beam of the European XFEL. LUXE is intended to study collisions between a high-intensity optical LASER and 16.5 GeV electrons from the XFEL electron beam, as well as collisions between the optical LASER and high-energy secondary photons. The physics objective of LUXE are processes of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) at the strong-field...

Grant Received for Developing New Type of Quantum Computer

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 17 March 2021

Jeremy Levy, Hrvoje Petek, and their team of researchers received a $7.5 million grant from the Office of Naval Research for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative to develop more efficient quantum computers. Their project, titled “Topological Spin Qubits Based on Graphene Nanoribbons,” seeks to develop a new type of qubit based on tiny strips of carbon atoms called graphene.

As of yet, no approach has been able to decisively meet all of the requirements for a scalable quantum computer. The team aims to change that by combining lithographic capabilities with synthetic chemistry protocols to create and manipulate atomically precise graphene nanoribbons in ways that may be useful for future quantum computing architectures.

Congrats Jeremy and Hrvoje!

PQI2021

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 16 March 2021

PQI2021 registration is open!

The annual PQI signature event will cover a wide range of topics in quantum science and engineering by featuring prominent invited keynote lecturers and highlighting the current research of PQI members.

Learn more about PQI2021 and register today!

...

Michael Hatridge receives 2021 Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 10 March 2021

The Chancellor's Distinguished Research Award annually recognizes outstanding scholarly accomplishments of members of the University of Pittsburgh's faculty. Junior Scholars include faculty members who have demonstrated great potential through the quality of their early contributions.

Professor Michael Hatridge is an outstanding researcher and has made significant contributions to the field of quantum information and quantum computing.  He has won multiple awards including the 2020 Alfred Sloan Research Fellowship and the 2019 NSF CAREER Award, and his research has been published by Nature, Science, Applied Physics Letters, and more.

Congratulations Michael!
 

Noa Marom Recieves ACS OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award

  • By Jennifer Zheng
  • 10 March 2021

Congratulations to Professor Noa Marom for winning the Spring 2021 American Chemical Society (ACS) OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award! 

This prestigious award is given to junior faculty members who show promise in computational chemistry and modeling. Up to four applicants are selected to win a $1000 prize and the opportunity to present their work at the San Antonio ACS National Meeting. 

Marom’s research uses quantum mechanical simulations, machine learning, and optimization algorithms to design materials with desired properties for various applications. Her award-winning work specifically involves the structure prediction and discovery of molecular crystals with enhanced electronic properties.

Quantum Bipartite Systems: Theory and Applications

Speaker(s): 
Dr. Lu Wei
Dates: 
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 10:00am

Abstract

Quantum information theory, a multi-disciplinary area of quantum physics, computer science, and mathematics, aims at understanding the theoretical underpinnings of quantum sciences that enables quantum computing and communications. Crucial to successful exploitation of the quantum revolutionary advances is the understanding of the non-classical phenomena of quantum entanglement. In this talk, we study the entanglement of quantum bipartite model and its applications to quantum information processing. 
 
In the first part of the talk, we discuss our...

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