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Our remote PQI2020 Seminar series starts off with a focus on quantum materials and our invited speaker Amir Yacoby from Harvard University. 

3:30-3:50 Jeremy Levy (University of Pittsburgh): Correlated Nanoelectronics: The Next Dimension 3:50-4:30 Amir Yacoby (Harvard University): Quantum Sensing Of Quantum Materials 4:30-4:50 Sara Majetich (Carnegie Mellon University): TBD

Dr. Hideo Mabuchi from Stanford University gave a talk titled "Coherent nonlinear dynamics and the physics of computation".

His early scientific research was focused on understanding open quantum systems, quantum measurement, and the quantum-to-classical transition. In recent years his research group has turned towards fundamental issues of quantum engineering, such as quantum nonlinear dynamics, quantum feedback control and quantum model reduction. Along the way his group has also worked substantially on single-molecule biophysics, quantum information science, and quantum materials. In parallel with directing his group's sponsored research, Hideo has developed a deep personal interest in exploring the interfaces of modern science with traditional craft, aesthetic philosophy and new materialism.

Professor Hideo Mabuchi from Stanford University talks about joining the Caltech faculty straight out of graduate school, coherent Ising machines, and learning to take oneself seriously.

Hideo Mabuchi received an AB in Physics from Princeton and a PhD in Physics from Caltech.  He served as Chair of the Department of Applied Physics at Stanford from 2010-2016.  His early scientific research was focused on understanding open quantum systems, quantum measurement, and the quantum-to-classical transition.  In recent years his research group has turned towards fundamental issues of quantum engineering, such as quantum nonlinear dynamics, quantum feedback control and quantum model reduction.  Along the way his group has also worked substantially on single-molecule biophysics, quantum information science, and quantum materials.  In parallel with directing his group's sponsored research, Hideo has developed a deep personal interest in exploring the interfaces of modern science with traditional craft, aesthetic philosophy and new materialism.  He has been experimenting with novel teaching initiatives to help resurrect the ideals of liberal education in the modern university.

Shreya Ghosh is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh.

She works in the Saxena lab and examines protein-DNA interactions using site directed Cu(II) spin labeling methods.

Shreya was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2018/2019.

*correction to typo at 0:19-0:25 is Ghosh

Minh Vo was a graduate student in the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

He worked with Karl Johnson and uses computational chemistry to study the reaction mechanisms of catalytic systems.

Minh was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2018/2019.

*correction to text at 0:18-0:24 is Minh and Department of Chemical Engineering

Arailym Kairalapova is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh.

She works in the Jordan lab and focuses on the non-valence correlation-bound anion states of small molecules and water clusters.

Arai was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2018/2019.

Shouvik Mukherjee is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh.

He works in the Snoke lab and investigates the many-body effects associated with the flow of exciton-polariton condensate in a narrow channel.

Shouvik was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2018/2019.

The annual PQI2020 poster session took place live on April 17th, 2020. 15 students shared the latest updates in their research in quantum science and engineering followed by questions from judges. Awards of 50 PQubits ($500/$1000 in tech/conference expenses) were distributed to the top 6 presenters.

Chenxu Liu is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh.

He works in the Pekker Lab on understanding the dynamics of various driven-dissipative quantum systems and their possible applications to operational quantum computers. He focuses on answering the question of how to achieve efficient and high fidelity manipulation of both matter and photon qubits in order to improve entangled state preparation, gate operation, transmission and detection of the resulting states of the qubits.

Chenxu was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2018/2019.

Dengyu Yang is a third year graduate student studying physics at the University of Pittsburgh. She describes how her mindset has evolved over the course of her studies and offers advice for new students.

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