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Electronic confinement at nanoscale dimensions remains a central means of science and technology.  I will describe a novel method for producing electronic nanostructures at the interface between two normally insulating oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3.  Conducting nanostructures are written, erased and reconfigured under ambient conditions at room temperature, similar to the operation of an etch-a-sketch toy.  A wide variety of devices can be created, including nanowires, tunnel junctions, diodes, field-effect transistors, single-electron transistors, superconducting nanowires, and nanoscale THz emitters and detectors.   After an introduction, I will focus on two recent results: the discovery of a novel phase in which electrons form pairs without becoming superconducting, and the discovery of electronically controlled ferromagnetism at room temperature.  Both phenomena occur in the same family of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterointerfaces.

Ed Gerjuoy gives a colloquim on the history of Physics.

Alexandre is an undergraduate senior who majors in physics at the University of Pittsburgh. He began his research with Professor Jeremy Levy when he was a freshman. Gauthier’s research focuses on the production of an advanced canvas analyzer, used to measure the electrical properties of multiterminal devices, and a low temperature scanning probe microscope, used to study electromechanical properties of single-electron transistors. He was awarded the Goldwater Scholarship for his innovations which was described by Chancellor Mark A. Nordenberg as “the highest national honor that can be won by undergraduate students studying science, math, or engineering, which makes the entire Pitt community particularly proud of Alexandre's selection.” 

Cong Wang is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

He works in the Petek lab where he does research in ultrafast surface phenomena.

Cong was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2014/2015 for his work on “Three-Dimensional Coherent Photoelectron Spectroscopy".

Michelle Tomczyk is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

She works in the Levy lab where she studies quantum transport phenomena at the lanthanum aluminate and strontium titanate interface. She creates nanostructures at the interface using an innovative AFM lithography technique in order to study emergent phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. This information can benefit classical as well as quantum computing.

Michelle won a travel award at the Science 2014 poster session for her poster on “Electron Pairing Without Superconductivity”.

Mathew Daniels is a graduate student in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University.

He works in the Xiao group on magnonics and antiferromagnets.

Mathew won a travel award at the Science 2014 poster session for his poster on “Spin-Transfer Torque Induced Spin Waves in Antiferromagnetic Insulators”.

Shonali Dhingra is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt. 

She works in the D’Urso lab where she couples nano oscillators to spin systems.

Shonali was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2014/2015 for her work on "Quantum Interactions Between a Nano-Mechanical Oscillator and a Single Spin".

Tuguldur Odbadrakh is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Pitt.

He works in the Jordan group on the infrared signature of protonated water clusters as well as the superatom states of buckyballs.

Tuguldur was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2014/2015 for his work on "Many-Body Polarization via Quantum Drude Oscillators and Its Application to Excess Electron Systems".

Gangqiang Liu is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Pitt.

He works inthe Snoke lab where he focuses on semiconductor microcavity structures and Bose-Einstein condensation. He hopes that his research will lead to the development of new kinds of lasers. 

Gangqiang was a PQI Graduate Student Research Fellow in 2014/2015 for his work on "Bose-Einstein Condensation and Superfluidity of Polaritons in a Ring Trap".

Sanxi Yao is a graduate student in the Department of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University.

He works in the Widom group and studies the phase transitions of boron carbide in order to gain insight on its properties that are currently not completely known.

Shanxi won a travel award at the Science 2014 poster session for his poster on the “Computational Studies of the Boron Carbide Structure”.

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