Opportunities

  • We are a newly established group at UCLA led by Prof. Clarice D. Aiello. Our mission is to establish the extent to which quantum mechanics accounts for biologically relevant phenomena, and can be manipulated to technological and therapeutic advantage. 

    Experiments suggest that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects involving spin might underlie biologically relevant phenomena as varied as magnetic field detection for animal navigation, metabolic regulation in cells and optimal... Read More

    Deadline: Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Featured Video

Recent News

PQI2020 Public Lecture Featuring Scott Aaronson

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 5 August 2020

Dr. Scott J. Aaronson, David J. Bruton Centennial Professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin, will give the PQI2020 Public Lecture on Thursday, August 20th at 3:30 PM. 

Last fall, a team at Google announced the first-ever demonstration of "quantum computational supremacy"---that is, a clear quantum speedup over a classical computer for some task---using a 53-qubit programmable superconducting chip called Sycamore.  In addition to engineering, Google's accomplishment built on a decade of research in quantum complexity theory.  This talk will discuss questions like: what exactly was the contrived problem that Google solved?  How does one verify the outputs using a classical computer?  And how confident are we that the problem is classically hard---especially in light of subsequent counterclaims by IBM?  He'll end with a proposed application for Google's experiment---namely, the generation of certified random bits, for use (for example) in proof-of-stake cryptocurrencies---that he has been developing and that Google is now working to demonstrate.

Click this link to watch live on the PQI Youtube channel and ask questions in the livechat.

NSF Funds Wissam Saidi for Computational Materials Research

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 5 August 2020

Dr. Wissam Saidi, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Pittsburgh, was selected to receive $600,000 of NSF funding over 3 years. The Saidi group develops and uses multiscale simulation tools, including force-field, density-functional theory, quantum Monte Carlo and quantum chemistry methods, to understand, predict, and design novel materials for applications in energy conversion and storage, surfaces and interfaces, spectroscopy, and nanoparticles.

The goal of the proposal, "DeepPDB: An open-source active-learning framework to enable high-fidelity atomistic simulations in unexplored material space", will be to offer an open-source toolkit with the ability to automatically generate estimates of force-fields parameters using advanced empirical-based computational tools.

David Waldeck Named a 2020 ACS Fellow

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 3 August 2020

David Waldeck, Professor in Chemistry at Pitt, was selected as one of the 2020 American Chemical Society (ACS) Fellows. The ACS Fellows program began in 2009 as a way to recognize ACS members for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and ACS. 

With regard to his science and profession, Dave is recognized for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of electron and spin transfer in molecules and their assemblies; and the positive impact of his administrative leadership and mentorship of junior colleagues.