Recent News

NSF funds $10 million expansion to Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 17 July 2019

On the morning of July 9, the National Science Foundation announced a $10 million dollar grant to the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) to fund a new piece of cutting-edge hardware for the local research institutions. Known as Bridges-2, the machine, currently under construction by Hewlett Packard Enterprise, will specialize in artificial intelligence and machine learning and is scheduled to launch in the summer of 2020.

Amazon prime deal on quantum computers

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 17 July 2019

If only! This headline might be a near-future reality soon enough though as a collaborative effort between UPitt professor Hrvoje Petek and a team at the University of Tsukuba has made progress towards affordable consumer quantum computers. Studying a novel process for creating coherent lattice waves inside silicon crystals using ultrashort laser pulses (shown in image), they were able to show that coherent vibrational signals could be maintained inside the samples. This research may lead to quantum computers based on existing silicon devices that can rapidly perform tasks out of the reach of even the fastest supercomputers now available.

dB-SERC awards help transform science education

  • By Jenny Stein
  • 28 June 2019

The need to bring different educational methods to different academic subjects has long been clear to Chandralekha Singh, a physics and astronomy professor at UPitt and director of dB-SERC — the Discipline-Based Science Education Research Center. She has been conducting research on discipline-based education for more than two decades. She continues to amass evidence that gearing educational methods to specific types of students in specific subjects can result in measurable gains in knowledge and in attitude, which can be just as important. On average, the GPAs of engineering majors in introduction physics courses, who are study subjects for Singh's students, did not change over four years

“I don’t believe it is the students’ fault,” she says, if they do not improve their GPAs across their college careers. “We as faculty in the University should think of it as our responsibility to help these students.” That’s the impetus behind dB-SERC and the motivation for its course transformation awards. Since db-SERC’s founding in 2013, it has funded as many as 10 awards annually — up to $10,000 — to natural sciences faculty members in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences.

The dB-SERC course transformation awardees meet weekly and present talks about their ideas and progress. “Participating in those, my first year at Pitt, I met a lot of the other science faculty,” Whittinghill recalls. “It helped me feel a part of a community at Pitt.” The weekly gatherings help faculty improve their approaches to course changes and conceive of new directions, based on others’ experience and thoughts, Singh says: “A lot of times when people are doing some innovative teaching and learning, things may not work as people expected. You may need to keep refining things to make them really adaptable to your students, to your own style.”