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Sara Majetich Named IEEE Fellow

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 5 December 2016

Sara Majetich has been named an IEEE Fellow. Majetich is being recognized for her contributions to the understanding of magnetic nanoparticles. She studies the fundamental physics of magnetic nanoparticles that have very uniform sizes and applies her work to the design of functional materials that have applications in data storage media, high-speed electronics and biomedicine.

Fellowship is the highest grade of membership in IEEE, and is considered to be a prestigious honor among the technical community. Fellowship is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors on only one-tenth of one percent of the total voting membership of the organization each year. The distinction recognizes outstanding accomplishments in any of the IEEE’s fields of interest, which focus on advancing technology for the benefit of humanity.

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Through its more than 400,000  members in 160 countries, the association is a leading authority on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.

Science2016 Poster Award Winners

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 5 December 2016

Congratulations to the Science2016 Poster Award Winners!

Dr. Ran Cheng (Xiao's group, CMU Physics), Ms. Xing Yee Gan (Millstone Group, Pitt Chemistry), Mr. Clinton Johnson (Garrett-Roe Lab, Pitt Chemistry), Ms. Megan Kirkendall (Levy Lab, Pitt Physics), Mr. Jun Li (Feenstra Group, CMU Physics), and Mr. Jierui Liang (Fullerton group, Pitt, Chemical Engineering) won a $1,000 award for conference travel in 2017 and an Amazon Echo Dot.

Snapshots of Proton Conduction Process in Water

  • By Aude Marjolin
  • 5 December 2016

Scientists Capture Snapshots of the Proton Conduction Process in Water

The motion of protons (positively charged H atoms) in water is associated with water’s conduction of electricity and is involved in many important processes including vision, signaling in biological systems, photosynthesis and, the operation of fuel cells. Both artificial photosynthetic systems and fuel cells are of growing interest for clean energy technologies. However, the details of how protons move in water have remained elusive, and an enhanced understanding of the nature of this process is needed to improve the technologies that depend on proton transfer.

An international team of scientists, including a University of Pittsburgh professor and graduate student, has used spectroscopic methods to obtain snapshots of the process by which a proton is relayed from one water molecule to the next. The research is published in a paper in the December 2, 2016 issue of the journal Science.

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