News


Susan Fullerton recognized with James Pommersheim Award for Excellence in Teaching Chemical Engineering

  • By Huiling Shao
  • 15 January 2019

Marking her ability to inspire students through novel demonstrations of complex subjects as well as her mentoring of women and underrepresented minorities, PQI member Susan Fullerton was awarded the 2018 James Pommersheim Award for Excellence in Teaching by the Department of Chemical and Petroleum  Engineering.

The Pommersheim Award was established by the Department and James M. Pommersheim '70 to recognize departmental faculty in the areas of lecturing, teaching, research methodology, and research mentorship of students. Dr. Pommersheim, formerly Professor of Chemical Engineering at Bucknell University, received his bachelor’s, master’s and PhD in chemical engineering from Pitt. “Susan’s accomplishments in teaching over such a short period of time speak to the heart of the Pommersheim award. Her imaginative use of hands-on experiments and demonstrations create a tremendous amount of enthusiasm among our students and generate her impressive teaching scores to match,” noted Steven Little, department chair and professor. “Also, Susan’s presentations on the “imposter syndrome” and achieving work-life balance have generated tremendous campus interest.  She has candidly shared her own experiences to help our students understand that feeling like an imposter is normal, and can drive further successes.”


Roger Mong and Jacob Tevis received NSF career award

  • By Huiling Shao
  • 8 January 2019

Roger Mong and Jacob Tevis were recognized by the National Science Foundation CAREER award. Roger Mong aims to develop and study a wide collection of quantum phenomena that may be used in the next step of the quantum revolution. The goal of his project is to study how quantum behavior can survive beyond the microscopic regime. Roger Mong and his team will look for ways in which fundamental particles, such as electrons, can be bound together similarly to how atoms form molecules. Tevis Jacobs’ research seeks to enable the rational design of new and better stabilizing support materials by elucidating the dependence of particle coarsening on the supporting surface structure. His investigation will develop new approaches to measure the attachment and stability of nanoparticles on well-defined surfaces under various conditions, enabling the rational engineering of surfaces to optimize the performance and lifetime of the nanoparticles. 


Jennifer Laaser and Susan Fullerton received NSF career award

  • By Huiling Shao
  • 1 January 2019

Jennifer Lasser and Susan Fullerton were recognized by the National Science Foundation CAREER award. Jennifer Laaser's research will investigate how the structure and dynamics of polymeric networks influence force-driven processes at the molecular scale, and will develop curricular materials and outreach activities aimed at promoting education and diversity in polymer science.  Susan Fullerton’s research investigation aims to continue shrinking the size and power consumption of electronics with new materials and new engineering approaches. She approaches this challenge by development of super-thin “all 2D” materials, whic are similar to a sheet of paper – if the paper were only a single molecule thick. 


Di Xiao and Rongchao Jin named among world's most highly cited researchers

  • By Huiling Shao
  • 4 December 2018

Di Xiao and Rongchao Jin were listed among the most cited researchers. Jin’s research focuses on nanochemistry, and he is well-known for developing new methodologies to create gold nanoparticles with precise numbers of atoms. Xiao’s research looks at the properties of materials in relation to quantum mechanics and how these properties can be harnessed for applications in electronic and magnetic devices.


Tevis Jacobs discovered surface of "ultra-smooth" nanomaterial steeper than Austrian Alps

  • By Huiling Shao
  • 4 December 2018

Tevis Jacobs and his team measured an ultrananocrystalline diamond coating, prized for its hard yet smooth properties, and showed that it is far rougher than previously believed. Their findings could help researchers better predict how surface topography affects surface properties for materials used in diverse environments from microsurgery and engines to satellite housings or spacecraft.


Jeremy Levy named American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow

  • By Ke Xu
  • 30 November 2018

American Association for Advancement of Science (AAAS) has appointed Jeremy Levy as member of its 2018 lifetime fellowship cohort. AAAS will recognize the award during its annual meeting on February 16, 2019. 

Levy’s research centers around the field of oxide nanoelectronics, quantum computation, quantum transport and nanoscale optics, semiconductor and oxide spintronics, and dynamical phenomena in oxide materials and films. 

Levy will join a list of distinguished scientists including inventor Thomas Edison, astronomer Maria Mitchell and computer scientist Grace Hopper.
 


Venkat Viswanathan and collaborators are developing powerful batteries that could power new eco-friendly planes

  • By Ke Xu
  • 27 November 2018

Venkat Viswanathan and his collaborator, MIT materials science professor Yet-Ming Chiang, are developing a new battery specifically designed for an advanced hybrid plane. Their work was recently featured in an article in Swarajya magazine and in MIT Technology Review. Rather than focusing their efforts on developing improved materials, the pair are working with magnetic forces to facilitate the improved movement of lithium ions within their batteries, accelerating electrical discharge. Their ultimate goal is to create a 12-seat plane that can fly more than 600 kilometers on a full charge.


Mostafa Bedewy and colleagues made a transparent flexible material of silk and nanotubes

  • By Ke Xu
  • 13 November 2018

Bedewy and colleagues discovered that silk combined with carbon nanotubes may lead to a new generation of biomedical devices and so-called transient, biodegradable electronics. They used microwave irradiation coupled with a solvent vapor treatment to provide a unique control mechanism for the protein structure and resulted in a flexible and transparent film comparable to synthetic polymers but one that could be both more sustainable and degradable. These regenerated silk fibroins and carbon nanotube films have potential for use in flexible electronics, biomedical devices and transient electronics such as sensors that would be used for a desired period inside the body ranging from hours to weeks, and then naturally dissolve. 

Their work was featured on the Oct. 26 cover of the American Chemistry Society journal Applied Nano Materials.


Joint Faculty and Research Scientist Position in Theoretical/Computational Quantum Condensed Matter and Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics

  • By Ke Xu
  • 1 November 2018

The Department of Physics at New York University, jointly with the Center for Computational Quantum Physics (CCQ) of the Simons Foundation’s Flatiron Institute, invites applications for a position in the general area of theoretical/computational quantum condensed matter and atomic molecular and optical physics. The position is a 50-50 joint appointment between New York University and CCQ, with the appointee spending half of her or his effort in each place. At NYU the opening is at the tenure track Assistant Professor level and, at CCQ, it is at the Associate Research Scientist level.


Susan Fullerton receives award from AAAS for making extraordinary contributions in the field of Chemical Science

  • By Ke Xu
  • 30 October 2018

Susan Fullerton receives 2019 Marion Milligan Mason Award from American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Susan is one of only five recipients nationwide recognized for “extraordinary contributions through their research programs and demonstrate a commitment to move their fields forward.”

First awarded in 2015, the award was made possible by the Marion Milligan Mason Fund, who provides grants of $50,000 every other year to women researchers engaged in basic research in the chemical sciences. In addition to research funding, the program provides leadership development and mentoring opportunities. 

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